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Effects of intramuscularly administered enrofloxacin on the susceptibility of commensal intestinal Escherichia coli in pigs (sus scrofa domestica)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, December 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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29 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of intramuscularly administered enrofloxacin on the susceptibility of commensal intestinal Escherichia coli in pigs (sus scrofa domestica)
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12917-017-1260-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Antje Römer, Gesine Scherz, Saskia Reupke, Jessica Meißner, Jürgen Wallmann, Manfred Kietzmann, Heike Kaspar

Abstract

In the European Union, various fluoroquinolones are authorised for the treatment of food producing animals. Each administration poses an increased risk of development and spread of antimicrobial resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of parenteral administration of enrofloxacin on the prevalence of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin susceptibilities in the commensal intestinal E. coli population. E. coli isolates from faeces of twelve healthy pigs were included. Six pigs were administered enrofloxacin on day 1 to 3 and after two weeks for further three days. The other pigs formed the control group. MIC values were determined. Virulence and resistance genes were detected by PCR. Phylogenetic grouping was performed by PCR. Enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were analysed in sedimentation samples by HPLC. Susceptibility shifts in commensal E. coli isolates were determined in both groups. Non-wildtype E. coli could be cultivated from two animals of the experimental group for the first time one week after the first administration and from one animal of the control group on day 28. The environmental load with enrofloxacin in sedimentation samples showed the highest amount between days one and five. The repeated parenteral administration of enrofloxacin to pigs resulted in rapidly increased MIC values (day 28: MIC up to 4 mg/L, day 35: MIC ≥ 32mg/L). E. coli populations of the control group in the same stable without direct contact to the experimental group were affected. The parenteral administration of enrofloxacin to piglets considerably reduced the number of the susceptible intestinal E. coli population which was replaced by E. coli strains with increased MIC values against enrofloxacin. Subsequently also pigs of the control were affected suggesting a transferability of strains from the experimental group through the environment to the control group especially as we could isolate the same PFGE strains from both pig groups and the environment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 14%
Other 3 10%
Student > Master 3 10%
Lecturer 2 7%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 8 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 21%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 8 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 December 2017.
All research outputs
#6,587,301
of 12,287,089 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#466
of 1,711 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#142,250
of 344,793 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#44
of 146 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,287,089 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,711 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,793 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 146 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.