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Arsenic trioxide induces differentiation of CD133+ hepatocellular carcinoma cells and prolongs posthepatectomy survival by targeting GLI1 expression in a mouse model

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Hematology & Oncology, March 2014
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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35 Dimensions

Readers on

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26 Mendeley
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Title
Arsenic trioxide induces differentiation of CD133+ hepatocellular carcinoma cells and prolongs posthepatectomy survival by targeting GLI1 expression in a mouse model
Published in
Journal of Hematology & Oncology, March 2014
DOI 10.1186/1756-8722-7-28
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ke-Zhi Zhang, Qiang-Bo Zhang, Quan-Bao Zhang, Hui-Chuan Sun, Jian-Yang Ao, Zong-Tao Chai, Xiao-Dong Zhu, Lu, Yuan-Yuan Zhang, Yang Bu, Ling-Qun Kong, Zhao-You Tang

Abstract

Cancer stem cells (CSCs) play a key role in the posthepatectomy recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). CD133+ HCC cells exhibit liver CSC-like properties, and CSC differentiation-inducing therapy may lead these cells to lose their self-renewal ability and may induce terminal differentiation, which may in turn allow their malignant potential to be controlled. Because arsenic trioxide (As₂O₃) increases remission rates and prolongs survival among patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia by inducing differentiation and apoptosis of leukemic cells, we hypothesized that As₂O₃ might also inhibit HCC recurrence and prolong survival time after hepatectomy by inducing differentiation of HCC CSCs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 15%
Lecturer 3 12%
Student > Postgraduate 3 12%
Researcher 3 12%
Other 2 8%
Other 6 23%
Unknown 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Unspecified 1 4%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 6 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 January 2015.
All research outputs
#11,171,500
of 12,556,105 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Hematology & Oncology
#464
of 550 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#233,510
of 286,498 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Hematology & Oncology
#29
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,556,105 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 550 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,498 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.