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Preventable deaths following emergency medical dispatch – an audit study

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, December 2014
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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1 Redditor

Citations

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17 Dimensions

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62 Mendeley
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Title
Preventable deaths following emergency medical dispatch – an audit study
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s13049-014-0074-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mikkel S Andersen, Søren Paaske Johnsen, Andreas Ernst Hansen, Eivinn Skjaerseth, Christian Muff Hansen, Jan Nørtved Sørensen, Søren Bruun Jepsen, Jesper Bjerring Hansen, Erika Frischknecht Christensen

Abstract

BackgroundCall taker triage of calls to the 112 emergency number, can be error prone because rapid decisions must be made based on limited information. Here we investigated the preventability and common characteristics of same-day deaths among patients who called 112 and were not assigned an ambulance with lights and sirens by the Emergency Medical Communication Centre (EMCC).MethodsAn audit was performed by an external panel of experienced prehospital consultant anaesthesiologists. The panel focused exclusively on the role of the EMCC, assessing whether same-day deaths among 112 callers could have been prevented if the EMCC had assessed the situations as highly urgent. The panels¿ assessments were based on review of patient charts and voice-log recordings of 112 calls. All patient related material was reviewed by the audit panel and all cases where then scored as preventable, potentially preventable or non-preventable during a two day meeting. The study setting was three of five regions in Denmark with a combined population of 4,182,613 inhabitants, which equals 75% of the Danish population. The study period was 18 months, from mid-2011 to the end of 2012.ResultsLinkage of prospectively collected EMCC data with population-based registries resulted in the identification of 94,488 non-high-acuity 112 callers. Among these callers, 152 (0.16% of all) died on the same day as the corresponding 112 call, and were included in this study. The mean age of included patients was 74.4 years (range, 31¿100 years) and 45.4% were female. The audit panel found no definitively preventable deaths; however, 18 (11.8%) of the analysed same-day deaths (0.02% of all non-high-acuity callers) were found to be potentially preventable. In 13 of these 18 cases, the dispatch protocol was either not used or not used correctly.ConclusionSame-day death rarely occurred among 112 callers whose situations were assessed as not highly urgent. No same-day deaths were found to be definitively preventable by a different EMCC call assessment, but a minority of same-day deaths could potentially have been prevented with more accurate triage. Better adherence with dispatch protocol could improve the safety of the dispatch process.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 61 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 16%
Student > Master 9 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Student > Postgraduate 6 10%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 4 6%
Other 14 23%
Unknown 11 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 28 45%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 15%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 3%
Unspecified 2 3%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 12 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 February 2015.
All research outputs
#12,001,561
of 20,829,778 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#737
of 1,205 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#155,899
of 339,536 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#34
of 66 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,829,778 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,205 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 339,536 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 66 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.