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Central nervous system transcriptome of Biomphalaria alexandrina, an intermediate host for schistosomiasis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, December 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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17 Mendeley
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Title
Central nervous system transcriptome of Biomphalaria alexandrina, an intermediate host for schistosomiasis
Published in
BMC Research Notes, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13104-017-3018-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tamer A. Mansour, Mohamed R. Habib, Laura C. Vicente Rodríguez, Anthony Hernández Vázquez, Julián Maldonado Alers, Alfredo Ghezzi, Roger P. Croll, C. Titus Brown, Mark W. Miller

Abstract

Globally, more than 200 million people live at risk of the neglected tropical disease schistosomiasis (or snail fever). Larval schistosomes require the presence of specific snail species that act as intermediate hosts, supporting their multiplication and transformation into forms that can infect humans. This project was designed to generate a transcriptome from the central nervous system (CNS) of Biomphalaria alexandrina, the major intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni in Egypt. A transcriptome was generated from five pooled central nervous systems dissected from uninfected specimens of B. alexandrina. Raw Illumina RNA-seq data (~ 20.3 million paired end reads of 150 base pairs length each) generated a transcriptome consisting of 144,213 transcript elements with an N50 contig size of 716 base pairs. Orthologs of 15,246 transcripts and homologs for an additional 16,810 transcripts were identified in the UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot database. The B. alexandrina CNS transcriptome provides a resource for future research exploring parasite-host interactions in a simpler nervous system. Moreover, increased understanding of the neural signaling mechanisms involved in the response of B. alexandrina to infection by S. mansoni larvae could lead to novel and highly specific strategies for the control of snail populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 18%
Researcher 2 12%
Professor 1 6%
Student > Master 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 4 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 18%
Neuroscience 2 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Other 3 18%
Unknown 4 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 February 2018.
All research outputs
#7,533,581
of 12,492,926 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#1,294
of 2,799 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#195,910
of 378,258 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#161
of 403 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,492,926 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,799 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 378,258 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 403 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.