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Influence of pharmacological education on perceptions, attitudes and use of dietary supplements by medical students

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, December 2017
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Title
Influence of pharmacological education on perceptions, attitudes and use of dietary supplements by medical students
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12906-017-2031-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Z. Stanojević-Ristić, S. Stević, J. Rašić, D. Valjarević, M. Dejanović, A. Valjarević

Abstract

The ready availability and use of dietary supplements (DS) by the public means that healthcare professionals require education in this area. In the Republic of Serbia, education related to use of DS is included in undergraduate medical training and it is therefore important to assess the effectiveness of this education. The aim of our survey was to investigate the influence of pharmacological education on the use, attitudes and perceptions of risks associated with DS among medical students. Medical students at the University of Kosovska Mitrovica participated in the survey. Three hundred eighty questionnaires were distributed, yielding a response rate of 89% (n = 334). Data were categorized by year of study, completion of a one-year course in pharmacology and having passed the final exam. The results were compared between 192 (58%) medical students educated in pharmacology (MSEP) and 142 (42%) medical students not educated in pharmacology (MSNEP). The questionnaire was divided into 4 parts: socio-demographic and lifestyle/behavioral characteristics, use of DS, attitudes about efficacy, safety and perception of risk due to DS use. Chi-square test, Student's t-test, and Mann-Whitney U test were used for statistical analysis. About 53% of respondents used some form of DS. Attitudes regarding the safety of DS consumption showed a difference between the groups. MSEP were more likely to agree that DS have the potential to cause adverse reactions (Likert scale mean 4.1 vs. 3.5, p < 0.001) as well as interactions with conventional drugs (Likert scale mean 4.2 vs. 3.2, p < 0.001) than MSNEP. Finally, MSEP ranked St. John's wort and ginkgo as the most dangerous DS, but creatine and vitamin C were both ranked as relatively safe. Conversely, MSNEP considered ginkgo and vitamin C the most harmful DS, claiming that omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D had the least hazardous side effects. Our results showed that pharmacological education gives young medical students a better understanding of the risks of DS-drug interactions and potential adverse effects. However, their overall attitudes and perception of risk indicate the need for further education.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 20%
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Master 6 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 12%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 12 24%
Unknown 8 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 14%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 10%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 6%
Other 10 20%
Unknown 9 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 December 2017.
All research outputs
#10,893,818
of 12,292,436 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#2,045
of 2,489 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#285,848
of 344,918 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#244
of 320 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,292,436 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,489 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,918 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 320 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.