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How does family functioning effect the outcome of family based treatment for adolescents with severe anorexia nervosa?

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Eating Disorders, December 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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15 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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78 Mendeley
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Title
How does family functioning effect the outcome of family based treatment for adolescents with severe anorexia nervosa?
Published in
Journal of Eating Disorders, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40337-017-0184-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew Wallis, Jane Miskovic-Wheatley, Sloane Madden, Paul Rhodes, Ross D. Crosby, Li Cao, Stephen Touyz

Abstract

The aim of this research was to investigate the relationship between family functioning, adolescent-parent attachment and remission, as well as changes in these variables over time for adolescents with severe anorexia nervosa treated with family based treatment (FBT). Understanding how families respond to treatment is important because the family will be the ongoing context for psychosocial development in the longer term. The relationship between family functioning and outcome is also an important variable because it is potentially modifiable during treatment and this may improve outcome. Fifty-seven female adolescents treated with FBT in a randomised controlled trial were assessed at baseline, FBT session 20 and 12-months post FBT session 20. Data on family functioning and adolescent-parent attachment was collected from patients and their parents at each time point. A series of regression analyses were used to determine the relationship between family functioning and comorbidity at baseline, and the relationship with remission status over time. Repeat measure mixed-effects models were used to assess changes in family functioning and attachment quality over time. Greater adolescent perceived family functioning impairment was positively related to psychiatric comorbidity at the start of treatment. Conversely, better family functioning predicted higher self-esteem and stronger attachment quality. Adolescent's reporting better general family functioning, communication and problem solving were more likely to be remitted at session 20, but not at 12-month follow-up. There was no overall improvement in family functioning for any respondent either during treatment or at follow-up, and no significant relationship between change and remission at either session 20 or follow-up. The adolescent's perspective on family functioning at the start of treatment impacts on a positive outcome. Addressing family issues earlier in FBT may be important for some patients. Further research is needed in this area to determine how these findings could be integrated into the current FBT model. Australian Clinical Trials Register number: ACTRN012607000009415 (www.anzctr.org.au).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 78 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 21%
Student > Bachelor 13 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 7 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 9%
Other 12 15%
Unknown 14 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 33 42%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 8%
Social Sciences 5 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 23 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 February 2018.
All research outputs
#1,874,370
of 16,580,141 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Eating Disorders
#155
of 429 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,387
of 414,512 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Eating Disorders
#30
of 56 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,580,141 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 429 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 414,512 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 56 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.