↓ Skip to main content

Nutrition, dietary interventions and prostate cancer: the latest evidence

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, January 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
69 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
3 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
100 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
316 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Nutrition, dietary interventions and prostate cancer: the latest evidence
Published in
BMC Medicine, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12916-014-0234-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pao-Hwa Lin, William Aronson, Stephen J Freedland

Abstract

Prostate cancer (PCa) remains a leading cause of mortality in US men and the prevalence continues to rise world-wide especially in countries where men consume a 'Western-style' diet. Epidemiologic, preclinical and clinical studies suggest a potential role for dietary intake on the incidence and progression of PCa. 'This minireview provides an overview of recent published literature with regard to nutrients, dietary factors, dietary patterns and PCa incidence and progression. Low carbohydrates intake, soy protein, omega-3 (w-3) fat, green teas, tomatoes and tomato products and zyflamend showed promise in reducing PCa risk or progression. A higher saturated fat intake and a higher β-carotene status may increase risk. A 'U' shape relationship may exist between folate, vitamin C, vitamin D and calcium with PCa risk. Despite the inconsistent and inconclusive findings, the potential for a role of dietary intake for the prevention and treatment of PCa is promising. The combination of all the beneficial factors for PCa risk reduction in a healthy dietary pattern may be the best dietary advice. This pattern includes rich fruits and vegetables, reduced refined carbohydrates, total and saturated fats, and reduced cooked meats. Further carefully designed prospective trials are warranted.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 69 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 316 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Nigeria 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 307 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 81 26%
Student > Master 52 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 9%
Researcher 27 9%
Other 16 5%
Other 47 15%
Unknown 65 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 98 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 41 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 39 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 26 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 2%
Other 31 10%
Unknown 75 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 61. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 March 2021.
All research outputs
#556,169
of 21,992,584 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#409
of 3,232 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,245
of 345,901 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#34
of 240 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,992,584 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,232 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 42.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 345,901 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 240 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.