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Diastolic dysfunction in the diabetic continuum: association with insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes

Overview of attention for article published in Cardiovascular Diabetology, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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102 Dimensions

Readers on

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83 Mendeley
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Title
Diastolic dysfunction in the diabetic continuum: association with insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes
Published in
Cardiovascular Diabetology, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12933-014-0168-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ricardo Fontes-Carvalho, Ricardo Ladeiras-Lopes, Paulo Bettencourt, Adelino Leite-Moreira, Ana Azevedo

Abstract

BackgroundDiabetes increases the risk of heart failure but the underlying mechanisms leading to diabetic cardiomyopathy are poorly understood. Left ventricle diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) is one of the earliest cardiac changes in these patients. We aimed to evaluate the association between LVDD with insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome (MS) and diabetes, across the diabetic continuum.MethodsWithin a population-based study (EPIPorto), a total of 1063 individuals aged ¿45 years (38% male, 61.2¿±¿9.6 years) were evaluated. Diastolic function was assessed by echocardiography, using tissue Doppler analysis (E¿ velocity and E/E¿ ratio) according to the latest consensus guidelines. Insulin resistance was assessed using the Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) score.ResultsThe HOMA-IR score correlated to E¿ velocity (¿¿=¿¿0.20;p¿<¿0.0001) and E/E¿ ratio (¿¿=¿0.20; p¿<¿0.0001). There was a progressive worsening in E¿ velocity (p for trend¿<¿0.001) and in E/E¿ ratio across HOMA-IR quartiles (p for trend <0.001). Individuals in the highest HOMA-IR quartile were more likely to have LVDD, even after adjustment for age, sex, blood pressure and body mass index (adjusted OR: 1.82; 95%CI: 1.09-3.03). From individuals with no MS, to patients with MS and no diabetes, to patients with diabetes, there was a progressive decrease in E¿ velocity (11.2¿±¿3.3 vs 9.7¿±¿3.1 vs 9.2¿±¿2.8 cm/s; p¿<¿0.0001), higher E/E¿ (6.9¿±¿2.3 vs 7.8¿±¿2.7 vs 9.0¿±¿3.6; p¿<¿0.0001) and more diastolic dysfunction (adjusted OR: 1.62; 95%CI: 1.12-2.36 and 1.78; 95%CI: 1.09-2.91, respectively).ConclusionsHOMA-IR score and metabolic syndrome were independently associated with LVDD. Changes in diastolic function are already present before the onset of diabetes, being mainly associated with the state of insulin resistance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 1%
Unknown 82 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 13 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 13%
Student > Master 10 12%
Researcher 9 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 18 22%
Unknown 16 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 41 49%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 2%
Other 5 6%
Unknown 22 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2015.
All research outputs
#7,575,497
of 14,054,251 outputs
Outputs from Cardiovascular Diabetology
#341
of 832 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#114,597
of 298,087 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cardiovascular Diabetology
#15
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,054,251 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 832 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,087 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.