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Variability of activity patterns across mood disorders and time of day

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, December 2017
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Title
Variability of activity patterns across mood disorders and time of day
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12888-017-1574-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karoline Krane-Gartiser, Arne E. Vaaler, Ole Bernt Fasmer, Kjetil Sørensen, Gunnar Morken, Jan Scott

Abstract

Few actigraphy studies in mood disorders have simultaneously included unipolar (UP) and bipolar (BD) depression or BD mixed states as a separate subgroup from mania. This study compared objectively measured activity in UP, BD depression, mania and mixed states and examined if patterns differed according to time of day and/or diagnostic group. Eighty -eight acutely admitted inpatients with mood disorders (52 UP; 18 mania; 12 BD depression; 6 mixed states) underwent 24 hours of actigraphy monitoring. Non-parametric analyses were used to compare median activity level over 24 h (counts per minute), two time series (64-min periods of continuous motor activity) in the morning and evening, and variability in activity across and within groups. There was no between-group difference in 24-h median level of activity, but significant differences emerged between BD depression compared to mania in the active morning period, and between UP and mania and mixed states in the active evening period. Within-group analyses revealed that UP cases showed several significant changes between morning and evening activity, with fewer changes in the BD groups. Mean activity over 24 hours has limited utility in differentiating UP and BD. In contrast, analysis of non-linear variability measures of activity at different times of day could help objectively distinguish between mood disorder subgroups. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01415323 , first registration July 6, 2011.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Other 4 7%
Professor 3 6%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 22 41%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 15%
Neuroscience 6 11%
Psychology 5 9%
Engineering 2 4%
Physics and Astronomy 2 4%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 27 50%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 June 2018.
All research outputs
#11,040,310
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#2,591
of 3,401 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#266,068
of 400,506 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#291
of 415 outputs
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