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Vita activa in biotechnology: what we do with fungi and what fungi do with us

Overview of attention for article published in Fungal Biology and Biotechnology, December 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#15 of 107)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
14 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
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Title
Vita activa in biotechnology: what we do with fungi and what fungi do with us
Published in
Fungal Biology and Biotechnology, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40694-017-0041-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Martin Weinhold, Edeltraud Mast-Gerlach, Vera Meyer

Abstract

Filamentous fungi are fascinating microorganisms. One of the reasons why it is so worthwhile to take a closer look at them is their capacity to produce secondary metabolites. Some of these substances have the potential to be of great use for mankind, such as it was the case with penicillin and its discovery in 1928. Almost a century later, the situation in healthcare could possibly turn back to the state before the development of the first antibiotics. Due to an overuse of antibiotics we are facing a surge of multiresistant bacteria that are not inhibited by any of the currently known drugs. That was part of the background why a European research project was launched in October 2013, titled "Quantitative Biology for Fungal Secondary Metabolite Producers", or "QuantFung". Fifteen young scientists embarked on a new phase in their career, moving to new work environments within Europe and dedicating their work lives intensively to the quest for useful secondary metabolites. After 4 years, the QuantFung project concluded in October this year. In this commentary, we aim to convey what it means to work in this field of fungal biotechnology and how important it is to improve the efficiency of the research therein. We introduce five out of the fifteen fellows at length and let them have their say about the adventure of science, euphoric moments, prospects and doubts. We also raise questions about the current state of research in academia, something the QuantFung fellows experienced first-hand. Being a scientist often goes beyond earning money to make one's living. This is why we also reflect on aspects of the meaning of work in our western society, where production for profit's sake is a main driver. For that we refer to one of the most distinguished thinkers of the twentieth century, to Hannah Arendt.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 19%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Other 7 26%
Unknown 2 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 19%
Engineering 2 7%
Arts and Humanities 1 4%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Other 6 22%
Unknown 3 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 June 2019.
All research outputs
#2,014,094
of 18,404,646 outputs
Outputs from Fungal Biology and Biotechnology
#15
of 107 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,087
of 421,056 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Fungal Biology and Biotechnology
#2
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,404,646 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 107 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 421,056 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.