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A nationwide population-based cohort study to identify the correlation between heart failure and the subsequent risk of herpes zoster

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2015
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Title
A nationwide population-based cohort study to identify the correlation between heart failure and the subsequent risk of herpes zoster
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-0747-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ping-Hsun Wu, Yi-Ting Lin, Chun-Yi Lin, Ming-Yii Huang, Wei-Chiao Chang, Wei-Pin Chang

Abstract

BackgroundThe association between heart failure (HF) and herpes zoster has rarely been studied. We investigated the hypothesis that HF may increase the risk of herpes zoster in Taiwan using a nationwide Taiwanese population-based claims database.MethodOur study cohort consisted of patients who received a diagnosis of HF in 2001¿~¿2009 (N¿=¿4785). For a comparison cohort, three age- and gender-matched control patients for every patient in the study cohort were selected using random sampling (N¿=¿14,355). All subjects were tracked for 1 year from the date of cohort entry to identify whether or not they had developed herpes zoster. Cox proportional-hazard regressions were performed to evaluate 1-year herpes zoster-free survival rates.ResultsThe main finding of this study was that patients with HF seemed to be at an increased risk of developing herpes zoster. Of the total patients, 211 patients developed herpes zoster during the 1-year follow-up period, among whom 83 were HF patients and 128 were in the comparison cohort. The adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) of herpes zoster in patients with HF was higher (AHR: 2.07; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.54¿~¿2.78; p¿<¿0.001) than that of the controls during the 1-year follow-up. Our study also investigated whether HF is a gender-dependent risk factor for herpes zoster. We found that male patients with HF had an increased risk of developing herpes zoster (AHR: 2.30 95% CI: 1.51¿~¿3.50; p¿<¿0.001).ConclusionsThe findings of our population-based study suggest that patients with HF may have an increased risk of herpes zoster. These health associations should be taken into consideration, and further studies should focused on the cost-effectiveness of the herpes zoster vaccine should be designed for HF patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 23%
Researcher 3 10%
Student > Master 3 10%
Student > Postgraduate 3 10%
Librarian 2 7%
Other 7 23%
Unknown 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 47%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 7%
Social Sciences 2 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 7%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 6 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 January 2015.
All research outputs
#7,945,351
of 9,164,890 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,591
of 4,030 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#200,371
of 247,521 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#176
of 185 outputs
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