↓ Skip to main content

An elevated plus-maze in mixed reality for studying human anxiety-related behavior

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, December 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
20 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
62 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
191 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
An elevated plus-maze in mixed reality for studying human anxiety-related behavior
Published in
BMC Biology, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12915-017-0463-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah V. Biedermann, Daniel G. Biedermann, Frederike Wenzlaff, Tim Kurjak, Sawis Nouri, Matthias K. Auer, Klaus Wiedemann, Peer Briken, Jan Haaker, Tina B. Lonsdorf, Johannes Fuss

Abstract

A dearth of laboratory tests to study actual human approach-avoidance behavior has complicated translational research on anxiety. The elevated plus-maze (EPM) is the gold standard to assess approach-avoidance behavior in rodents. Here, we translated the EPM to humans using mixed reality through a combination of virtual and real-world elements. In two validation studies, we observed participants' anxiety on a behavioral, physiological, and subjective level. Participants reported higher anxiety on open arms, avoided open arms, and showed an activation of endogenous stress systems. Participants' with high anxiety exhibited higher avoidance. Moreover, open arm avoidance was moderately predicted by participants' acrophobia and sensation seeking, with opposing influences. In a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled experiment, GABAergic stimulation decreased avoidance of open arms while alpha-2-adrenergic antagonism increased avoidance. These findings demonstrate cross-species validity of open arm avoidance as a translational measure of anxiety. We thus introduce the first ecologically valid assay to track actual human approach-avoidance behavior under laboratory conditions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 191 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 191 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 27 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 14%
Student > Bachelor 26 14%
Student > Master 25 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 8%
Other 31 16%
Unknown 40 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 36 19%
Psychology 30 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 7%
Computer Science 11 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 5%
Other 33 17%
Unknown 59 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 55. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 January 2021.
All research outputs
#542,504
of 19,998,134 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#137
of 1,713 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,725
of 432,167 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#23
of 127 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,998,134 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,713 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 432,167 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 127 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.