↓ Skip to main content

Exploring the extended role of the community pharmacist in improving blood pressure control among hypertensive patients in a developing setting

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, December 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
66 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Exploring the extended role of the community pharmacist in improving blood pressure control among hypertensive patients in a developing setting
Published in
Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40545-017-0127-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Afia Frimpomaa Asare Marfo, Frances Thelma Owusu-Daaku

Abstract

In most developing countries including Ghana, there is scant literature on the involvement of the community pharmacist in the care of patients with chronic conditions such as hypertension and blood pressure control. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of a pharmaceutical care model on blood pressure control and adherence among hypertensive patients. This was a quasi experimental design and the primary outcome measure was a change in systolic and diastolic blood pressure. One hundred and eighty hypertensive patients were recruited for the study: 90 in the intervention group and 90 in the control group. The intervention, consisting of health education, adherence counselling and medicine use review; was offered monthly for six months. At baseline there was no significant difference in demographic and clinical characteristics between the intervention and control group. Pharmaceutical care issues identified among the intervention group during the 6 months period were non effectiveness of therapy (n = 23), experience of side effects (n = 20) and nonadherence to therapy (n = 40). The mean diastolic blood pressure difference between the intervention group and the control group was statistically significant (p = 0.001). The mean adherence difference between the two groups was also statistically significant at the end of the study. (p = 0.001). The pharmaceutical care intervention offered by the pharmacist led to the resolution of some pharmaceutical care issues, improvement in diastolic blood pressure and adherence among hypertensive patients. Guidelines and polices to streamline these services are needed if they are to be made available in community pharmacies in developing countries.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 66 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 9%
Student > Master 6 9%
Researcher 5 8%
Other 12 18%
Unknown 22 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 19 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 9%
Engineering 2 3%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 3%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 22 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 January 2018.
All research outputs
#4,212,510
of 15,580,648 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#79
of 228 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#123,819
of 407,212 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#12
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,580,648 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 228 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 407,212 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.