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Knowledge and possession of take-home naloxone kits among street-involved youth in a Canadian setting: a cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Harm Reduction Journal, December 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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65 Mendeley
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Title
Knowledge and possession of take-home naloxone kits among street-involved youth in a Canadian setting: a cohort study
Published in
Harm Reduction Journal, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12954-017-0206-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Julia Goldman-Hasbun, Kora DeBeck, Jane A. Buxton, Ekaterina Nosova, Evan Wood, Thomas Kerr

Abstract

The distribution of take-home naloxone (THN) kits has been an important strategy in reducing overdose fatalities among people who use drugs. However, little is known about the use of THN among youth who are street-involved. The present study explores knowledge and possession of THN among street-involved youth in a Canadian setting. Data were derived from the At-Risk Youth Study (ARYS), a prospective cohort of street-involved youth age 14-28 at enrollment in Vancouver, Canada. Participants completed a standardized questionnaire, which included items related to knowledge and possession of THN, sociodemographic characteristics, and substance use-related factors. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify factors independently associated with knowledge and possession of THN. Between December 2014 and November 2016, 177 youth were interviewed, including 68 females (38.4%). While 126 (71.2%) participants reported knowledge of THN, only 40 (22.6%) possessed a THN kit. Caucasian/white ethnicity was found to be positively associated with both knowledge and possession of THN (both p < 0.05). Public injection drug use in the last 6 months was found to be positively associated with knowledge of THN, while daily heroin use and daily methamphetamine use were associated with possession of THN (all p < 0.05). Male gender was negatively associated with possession of THN (p < 0.05). These findings highlight important gaps between knowledge and possession of THN among youth and the need to increase participation in THN programs among specific populations including non-white and male youth. Further research is needed to gain a better understanding of the barriers that may prevent certain youth from acquiring THN kits.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 65 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 25%
Student > Master 12 18%
Researcher 5 8%
Other 3 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 3%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 20 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 15%
Social Sciences 6 9%
Psychology 5 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 6%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 22 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 February 2018.
All research outputs
#3,004,573
of 12,448,635 outputs
Outputs from Harm Reduction Journal
#310
of 469 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,309
of 372,364 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Harm Reduction Journal
#59
of 79 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,448,635 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 469 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.5. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 372,364 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 79 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.