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Overweight in children and its perception by parents: cross-sectional observation in a general pediatric outpatient clinic

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pediatrics, December 2017
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Title
Overweight in children and its perception by parents: cross-sectional observation in a general pediatric outpatient clinic
Published in
BMC Pediatrics, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12887-017-0964-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniela Nemecek, Christian Sebelefsky, Astrid Woditschka, Peter Voitl

Abstract

Childhood overweight is a growing problem in industrialized countries. Parents play a major role in the development and the treatment of overweight in their children. A key factor here is the perception of their child's weight status. As we know of other studies, parental perception of children's weight status is very poor. This study aimed to determine factors associated with childhood overweight and parental misperception of weight status. The height and weight of children, as reported by parents were compared with measured data. The study was conducted at a general pediatric outpatient clinic in Vienna, Austria. A total of 600 children (aged 0-14 years) participated in the study. Collection of data was performed by means of a questionnaire comprising items relating to parental weight and social demographics. The parents were also asked to indicate their children's weight and height, as well as the estimated weight status. Children were weighed and measured and BMI was calculated, allowing a comparison of estimated values and weight categories with the measured data. Parental BMI, parental weight and a higher birth weight were identified as factors associated with childhood overweight. No association with the parents' educational status or citizenship could be proven. We compared parents' estimations of weight and height of their children with measured data. Here we found, that parental estimated values often differ from measured data. Using only parental estimated data to define weight status leads to misclassifications. It could be seen that parents of overweight children tend to underestimate the weight status of their children, compared to parents of children with normal weight. Pediatricians should bear in mind that parental assessment often differs from the measured weight of their children. Hence children should be weighed and measured regularly to prevent them from becoming overweight. This is of particular importance in children with higher birth weight and children of overweight parents. Study was not registered. The study was approved by the Ethic committee of the city of Vienna. (EK 13-146-VK).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 64 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 25%
Student > Bachelor 13 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 3%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 13 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 17%
Sports and Recreations 7 11%
Psychology 3 5%
Arts and Humanities 2 3%
Other 10 16%
Unknown 13 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 December 2017.
All research outputs
#9,462,425
of 12,346,626 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pediatrics
#1,083
of 1,437 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#228,210
of 348,489 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pediatrics
#46
of 72 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,346,626 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,437 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 348,489 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 72 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.