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Genetic diversity of Leishmania donovani that causes cutaneous leishmaniasis in Sri Lanka: a cross sectional study with regional comparisons

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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65 Mendeley
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Title
Genetic diversity of Leishmania donovani that causes cutaneous leishmaniasis in Sri Lanka: a cross sectional study with regional comparisons
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2883-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Udeshika Lakmini Kariyawasam, Angamuthu Selvapandiyan, Keshav Rai, Tasaduq Hussain Wani, Kavita Ahuja, Mizra Adil Beg, Hasitha Upendra Premathilake, Narayan Raj Bhattarai, Yamuna Deepani Siriwardena, Daibin Zhong, Guofa Zhou, Suman Rijal, Hira Nakhasi, Nadira D. Karunaweera

Abstract

Leishmania donovani is the etiological agent of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in the Indian subcontinent. However, it is also known to cause cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Sri Lanka. Sri Lankan L. donovani differs from other L. donovani strains, both at the molecular and biochemical level. To investigate the different species or strain-specific differences of L. donovani in Sri Lanka we evaluated sequence variation of the kinetoplastid DNA (kDNA). Parasites isolated from skin lesions of 34 CL patients and bone marrow aspirates from 4 VL patients were genotyped using the kDNA minicircle PCR analysis. A total of 301 minicircle sequences that included sequences from Sri Lanka, India, Nepal and six reference species of Leishmania were analyzed. Haplotype diversity of Sri Lankan isolates were high (H d  = 0.757) with strong inter-geographical genetic differentiation (F ST  > 0.25). In this study, L. donovani isolates clustered according to their geographic origin, while Sri Lankan isolates formed a separate cluster and were clearly distinct from other Leishmania species. Within the Sri Lankan group, there were three distinct sub-clusters formed, from CL patients who responded to standard antimony therapy, CL patients who responded poorly to antimony therapy and from VL patients. There was no specific clustering of sequences based on geographical origin within Sri Lanka. This study reveals high levels of haplotype diversity of L. donovani in Sri Lanka with a distinct genetic association with clinically relevant phenotypic characteristics. The use of genetic tools to identify clinically relevant features of Leishmania parasites has important therapeutic implications for leishmaniasis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 65 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 15%
Student > Master 9 14%
Student > Bachelor 9 14%
Researcher 8 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 5%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 19 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 25 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 March 2018.
All research outputs
#7,301,613
of 12,731,604 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,134
of 4,727 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#182,467
of 384,898 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#283
of 653 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,731,604 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,727 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 384,898 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 653 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.