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Patient factors associated with SSRI dose for depression treatment in general practice: a primary care cross sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Family Practice, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Patient factors associated with SSRI dose for depression treatment in general practice: a primary care cross sectional study
Published in
BMC Family Practice, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12875-014-0210-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chris F Johnson, Nadine J Dougall, Brian Williams, Stephen A MacGillivray, Alasdair I Buchanan, Richard D Hassett

Abstract

BackgroundAntidepressant prescribing continues to rise. Increased long-term prescribing and higher doses are contributing to current growth; however, patient factors associated with the use of higher doses remain unknown. This study¿s aim was to investigate patient factors associated with selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) prescribed daily dose for depression treatment in general practice.MethodsA stratified sample of low to high prescribing practices were selected. Routine individual patient-level data were extracted one practice at a time: September 2009 to January 2011. Patients included were ¿18 years, and prescribed an SSRI for depression. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken to assess individual predictor variables on SSRI daily dose by standard therapeutic dose versus higher dose, as SSRIs demonstrate flat dose response curves for depression treatment. Predictor variables included: age, gender, deprivation, co-morbidity, smoking status, being prescribed the same SSRI for ¿2 years, and patients¿ general practice. For a subgroup of patients a second sub-group analysis included long-term benzodiazepine and/or z-hypnotic (B&Z) as a predictor variable.ResultsInter-practice SSRI prescribing varied significantly; practice point prevalence ranged from 2.5% (94/3697) to 11.9% (359/3007) of the practice population ¿18 years old; median 7.3% (250/3421) (¿2¿=¿2277.2, df¿=¿10, p¿<¿0.001). Overall point prevalence was 6.3% (3518/52575), with 5.8% (3066/52575) prescribed SSRIs for depression of whom 84.7% (2596/3066) had data for regression analysis. Higher SSRI doses were significantly associated with, in descending order of magnitude, individual practice attended, being prescribed the same SSRI for ¿2 years (Odds Ratio (OR) 1.80, 95% CI 1.49 to 2.17, p¿<¿0.001) and living in a more deprived area (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.11 to 2.16, p¿=¿0.009). Higher SSRI doses in the B&Z subgroup were significantly associated with individual practice attended, being prescribed a long-term B&Z (OR 2.05 95% CI 1.47 to 2.86, p¿<¿0.001) and being prescribed the same SSRI for ¿2 years (OR 1.94, 95% CI 1.53 to 2.47, p¿<¿0.001).ConclusionHigher SSRI doses for depression were associated with practice attended and being prescribed the same antidepressant for ¿2 years. As long-term antidepressant use increases, the use of higher doses may further contribute to prescribing growth.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 26%
Researcher 6 14%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Lecturer 3 7%
Other 8 19%
Unknown 7 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 31%
Psychology 5 12%
Neuroscience 3 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 9 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 August 2018.
All research outputs
#7,206,719
of 13,444,601 outputs
Outputs from BMC Family Practice
#742
of 1,342 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#104,223
of 278,309 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Family Practice
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,444,601 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,342 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,309 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them