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Development of an intervention to reduce antibiotic use for childhood coughs in UK primary care using critical synthesis of multi-method research

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Research Methodology, December 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

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84 Mendeley
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Title
Development of an intervention to reduce antibiotic use for childhood coughs in UK primary care using critical synthesis of multi-method research
Published in
BMC Medical Research Methodology, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12874-017-0455-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Patricia J. Lucas, Jenny Ingram, Niamh M. Redmond, Christie Cabral, Sophie L. Turnbull, Alastair D. Hay

Abstract

Overuse of antibiotics contributes to the global threat of antimicrobial resistance. Antibiotic stewardship interventions address this threat by reducing the use of antibiotics in occasions or doses unlikely to be effective. We aimed to develop an evidence-based, theory-informed, intervention to reduce antibiotic prescriptions in primary care for childhood respiratory tract infections (RTI). This paper describes our methods for doing so. Green and Krueter's Precede/Proceed logic model was used as a framework to integrate findings from a programme of research including 5 systematic reviews, 3 qualitative studies, and 1 cohort study. The model was populated using a strength of evidence approach, and developed with input from stakeholders including clinicians and parents. The synthesis produced a series of evidence-based statements summarizing the quantitative and qualitative evidence for intervention elements most likely to result in changes in clinician behaviour. Current evidence suggests that interventions which reduce clinical uncertainty, reduce clinician/parent miscommunication, elicit parent concerns, make clear delayed or no-antibiotic recommendations, and provide clinicians with alternate treatment actions have the best chance of success. We designed a web-based within-consultation intervention to reduce clinician uncertainty and pressure to prescribe, designed to be used when children with RTI present to a prescribing clinician in primary care. We provide a worked example of methods for the development of future complex interventions in primary care, where multiple factors act on multiple actors within a complex system. Our synthesis provided intervention guidance, recommendations for practice, and highlighted evidence gaps, but questions remain about how best to implement these recommendations. The funding structure which enabled a single team of researchers to work on a multi-method programme of related studies (NIHR Programme Grant scheme) was key in our success. The feasibility study accompanying this intervention was prospectively registered with the ISRCTN registry ( ISRCTN23547970 ), on 27 June 2014.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 84 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 21%
Student > Master 16 19%
Researcher 9 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 11%
Other 6 7%
Other 12 14%
Unknown 14 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 8%
Social Sciences 6 7%
Psychology 5 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 4%
Other 16 19%
Unknown 24 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 January 2018.
All research outputs
#3,574,385
of 13,900,273 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Research Methodology
#540
of 1,274 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,166
of 398,056 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Research Methodology
#56
of 146 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,900,273 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,274 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 398,056 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 146 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.