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Elevated cerebrovascular resistance index is associated with cognitive dysfunction in the very-old

Overview of attention for article published in Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, January 2015
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Title
Elevated cerebrovascular resistance index is associated with cognitive dysfunction in the very-old
Published in
Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13195-014-0080-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lindsay R Clark, Daniel A Nation, Christina E Wierenga, Katherine J Bangen, Sheena I Dev, David D Shin, Lisa Delano-Wood, Thomas T Liu, Robert A Rissman, Mark W Bondi

Abstract

Age-related vascular changes, including blood pressure elevation and cerebral blood flow (CBF) reduction, are associated with cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Evidence suggests that the relationship between blood pressure and dementia risk varies between younger and older samples within the elderly population. We examined the relationship between mean arterial pressure (MAP), CBF, and cognition in young-old (60 to 75 years of age) versus very-old (80+ years of age) adults. Fifty-eight non-demented older adults completed an arterial spin labeling MRI scan, and an index of cerebrovascular resistance (CVRi) was estimated for each participant by calculating the ratio of MAP and CBF. Results demonstrated a similar negative relationship between MAP and CBF across both age groups. However, very-old participants exhibited elevated CVRi and reduced CBF compared to young-old participants in regions implicated in AD and cerebral small vessel disease. Furthermore, significant age by CVRi interactions revealed that elevated CVRi in the thalamus was inversely related to verbal fluency performance in the very-old group. Findings support CVRi as a potential vascular biomarker and suggest that regionally-specific vascular changes may contribute to cognitive decline, particularly in the very-old.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 51 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 19%
Researcher 7 13%
Student > Master 7 13%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 11 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 27%
Neuroscience 8 15%
Psychology 5 10%
Engineering 2 4%
Sports and Recreations 2 4%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 14 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 January 2015.
All research outputs
#3,307,817
of 4,669,204 outputs
Outputs from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#185
of 222 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,791
of 160,855 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#26
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,669,204 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 222 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 160,855 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.