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Interaction of healthcare worker hands and portable medical equipment: a sequence analysis to show potential transmission opportunities

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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39 Dimensions

Readers on

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66 Mendeley
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Title
Interaction of healthcare worker hands and portable medical equipment: a sequence analysis to show potential transmission opportunities
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2895-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chetan Jinadatha, Frank C. Villamaria, John D. Coppin, Charles R. Dale, Marjory D. Williams, Ryan Whitworth, Mark Stibich

Abstract

While research has demonstrated the importance of a clean health care environment, there is a lack of research on the role portable medical equipment (PME) play in the transmission cycle of healthcare-acquired infections (HAIs). This study investigated the patterns and sequence of contact events among health care workers, patients, surfaces, and medical equipment in a hospital environment. Research staff observed patient care events over six different 24 h periods on six different hospital units. Each encounter was recorded as a sequence of events and analyzed using sequence analysis and visually represented by network plots. In addition, a point prevalence microbial sample was taken from the computer on wheels (COW). The most touched items during patient care was the individual patient (850), bedrail (375), bed-surface (302), and bed side Table (223). Three of the top ten most common subsequences included touching PME and the patient: computer on wheels ➔ patient (62 of 274 total sequences, 22.6%, contained this sequence), patient ➔ COW (20.4%), and patient ➔ IV pump (16.1%). The network plots revealed large interconnectedness among objects in the room, the patient, PME, and the healthcare worker. Our results demonstrated that PME such as COW and IV pump were two of the most highly-touched items during patient care. Even with proper hand sanitization and personal protective equipment, this sequence analysis reveals the potential for contamination from the patient and environment, to a vector such as portable medical equipment, and ultimately to another patient in the hospital.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 66 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 20%
Researcher 10 15%
Student > Bachelor 10 15%
Student > Master 10 15%
Other 5 8%
Other 9 14%
Unknown 9 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 10 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 9 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 11%
Engineering 4 6%
Other 14 21%
Unknown 14 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 May 2018.
All research outputs
#4,699,073
of 15,930,054 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,462
of 5,802 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#136,174
of 408,807 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#191
of 650 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,930,054 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,802 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 408,807 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 650 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.