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Intraoperative renal near-infrared spectroscopy indicates developing acute kidney injury in infants undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass: a case–control study

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)

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1 tweeter
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Citations

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97 Mendeley
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Title
Intraoperative renal near-infrared spectroscopy indicates developing acute kidney injury in infants undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass: a case–control study
Published in
Critical Care, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13054-015-0760-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bettina Ruf, Vittorio Bonelli, Gunter Balling, Jürgen Hörer, Nicole Nagdyman, Siegmund Lorenz Braun, Peter Ewert, Karl Reiter

Abstract

IntroductionAcute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass in infants. Renal near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) evaluates regional oximetry in a non-invasive continuous real-time fashion, and reflects tissue perfusion. This study aimed to evaluate the relation between renal oximetry and development of AKI in the operative and post-operative setting in infants undergoing cardiopulmonary surgery.MethodsIn this prospective study we enrolled 59 infants undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery for congenital heart disease for uni-ventricular (n¿=¿26) or bi-ventricular (n¿=¿33) repair. Renal NIRS was continuously measured intraoperatively and at least 24 hours postoperatively, and analysed for the intraoperative and first 12, first 24 and following 24 hours periods. The renal oximetry values were correlated with the pediatric Risk-Injury-Failure-Loss-End (pRIFLE) classification for AKI, renal biomarkers and the postoperative course.Results28 (48%) infants developed AKI based on pRIFLE classification. Already in the intraoperative renal oximetry and further in the first 12, 24 and 48 hours postoperatively significantly lower renal oximetry values in AKI patients as compared to patients with normal renal function could be shown (P¿<¿0.05). 11% (3 out of 28) of infants with AKI needed renal replacement therapy and 2 out of 28 (7 %) died. In the non-AKI group no fatal course occurred. Infants with decreased renal oximetry values developed significantly higher lactate levels 24 hours after surgery. Cystatin C was a late parameter of AKI and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin values were not correlated with AKI occurrence.ConclusionOur results suggest that prolonged lower renal oximetry values during cardiac surgery correlate with the development of AKI and may be superior to conventional biochemical markers. Renal NIRS might be a promising non-invasive tool of a multimodal monitoring of kidney function and developing AKI in infants undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 97 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 95 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 14%
Researcher 14 14%
Other 13 13%
Student > Postgraduate 12 12%
Student > Bachelor 10 10%
Other 25 26%
Unknown 9 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 60 62%
Engineering 4 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 3%
Neuroscience 2 2%
Other 11 11%
Unknown 14 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 February 2015.
All research outputs
#2,182,801
of 4,728,273 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#1,581
of 2,606 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,161
of 165,564 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#103
of 122 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,728,273 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,606 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 165,564 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 122 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.