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Factors influencing microbial colonies in the air of operating rooms

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
1 policy source
twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

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30 Dimensions

Readers on

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90 Mendeley
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Title
Factors influencing microbial colonies in the air of operating rooms
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2928-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ling Fu Shaw, Ian Horng Chen, Chii Shya Chen, Hui Hsin Wu, Li Shing Lai, Yin Yin Chen, Fu Der Wang

Abstract

The operating room (OR) of the hospital is a special unit that requires a relatively clean environment. The microbial concentration of an indoor OR extrinsically influences surgical site infection rates. The aim of this study was to use active sampling methods to assess microbial colony counts in working ORs and to determine the factors affecting air contamination in a tertiary referral medical center. This study was conducted in 28 operating rooms located in a 3000-bed medical center in northern Taiwan. The microbiologic air counts were measured using an impactor air sampler from May to August 2015. Information about the procedure-related operative characteristics and surgical environment (environmental- and personnel-related factors) characteristics was collected. A total of 250 air samples were collected during surgical procedures. The overall mean number of bacterial colonies in the ORs was 78 ± 47 cfu/m3. The mean number of colonies was the highest for transplant surgery (123 ± 60 cfu/m3), followed by pediatric surgery (115 ± 30.3 cfu/m3). A total of 25 samples (10%) contained pathogens; Coagulase-negative staphylococcus (n = 12, 4.8%) was the most common pathogen. After controlling for potentially confounding factors by a multiple regression analysis, the surgical stage had the significantly highest correlation with bacterial counts (r = 0.346, p < 0.001). Otherwise, independent factors influencing bacterial counts were the type of surgery (29.85 cfu/m3, 95% CI 1.28-58.42, p = 0.041), site of procedure (20.19 cfu/m3, 95% CI 8.24-32.14, p = 0.001), number of indoor staff (4.93 cfu/m3, 95% CI 1.47-8.38, p = 0.005), surgical staging (36.5 cfu/m3, 95% CI 24.76-48.25, p < 0.001), and indoor air temperature (9.4 cfu/m3, 95% CI 1.61-17.18, p = 0.018). Under the well-controlled ventilation system, the mean microbial colony counts obtained by active sampling in different working ORs were low. The number of personnel and their activities critically influence the microbe concentration in the air of the OR. We suggest that ORs doing complex surgeries with more surgical personnel present should increase the frequency of air exchanges. A well-controlled ventilation system and infection control procedures related to environmental and surgical procedures are of paramount importance for reducing microbial colonies in the air.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 90 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 17%
Researcher 11 12%
Student > Bachelor 9 10%
Professor 4 4%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 4%
Other 15 17%
Unknown 32 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 10%
Engineering 8 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 6%
Environmental Science 4 4%
Other 12 13%
Unknown 37 41%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 November 2019.
All research outputs
#1,620,450
of 21,169,209 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#420
of 7,232 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,570
of 439,943 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#45
of 658 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,169,209 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,232 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 439,943 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 658 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.