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Cribriform and intraductal prostate cancer are associated with increased genomic instability and distinct genomic alterations

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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13 tweeters

Citations

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71 Dimensions

Readers on

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90 Mendeley
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Title
Cribriform and intraductal prostate cancer are associated with increased genomic instability and distinct genomic alterations
Published in
BMC Cancer, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12885-017-3976-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

René Böttcher, Charlotte F. Kweldam, Julie Livingstone, Emilie Lalonde, Takafumi N. Yamaguchi, Vincent Huang, Fouad Yousif, Michael Fraser, Robert G. Bristow, Theodorus van der Kwast, Paul C. Boutros, Guido Jenster, Geert J. L. H. van Leenders

Abstract

Invasive cribriform and intraductal carcinoma (CR/IDC) is associated with adverse outcome of prostate cancer patients. The aim of this study was to determine the molecular aberrations associated with CR/IDC in primary prostate cancer, focusing on genomic instability and somatic copy number alterations (CNA). Whole-slide images of The Cancer Genome Atlas Project (TCGA, N = 260) and the Canadian Prostate Cancer Genome Network (CPC-GENE, N = 199) radical prostatectomy datasets were reviewed for Gleason score (GS) and presence of CR/IDC. Genomic instability was assessed by calculating the percentage of genome altered (PGA). Somatic copy number alterations (CNA) were determined using Fisher-Boschloo tests and logistic regression. Primary analysis were performed on TCGA (N = 260) as discovery and CPC-GENE (N = 199) as validation set. CR/IDC growth was present in 80/260 (31%) TCGA and 76/199 (38%) CPC-GENE cases. Patients with CR/IDC and ≥ GS 7 had significantly higher PGA than men without this pattern in both TCGA (2.2 fold; p = 0.0003) and CPC-GENE (1.7 fold; p = 0.004) cohorts. CR/IDC growth was associated with deletions of 8p, 16q, 10q23, 13q22, 17p13, 21q22, and amplification of 8q24. CNAs comprised a total of 1299 gene deletions and 369 amplifications in the TCGA dataset, of which 474 and 328 events were independently validated, respectively. Several of the affected genes were known to be associated with aggressive prostate cancer such as loss of PTEN, CDH1, BCAR1 and gain of MYC. Point mutations in TP53, SPOP and FOXA1were also associated with CR/IDC, but occurred less frequently than CNAs. CR/IDC growth is associated with increased genomic instability clustering to genetic regions involved in aggressive prostate cancer. Therefore, CR/IDC is a pathologic substrate for progressive molecular tumour derangement.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 90 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 12%
Other 10 11%
Unspecified 7 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 7 8%
Other 19 21%
Unknown 17 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 34 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 13%
Unspecified 6 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 4%
Engineering 3 3%
Other 6 7%
Unknown 25 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 January 2018.
All research outputs
#4,347,127
of 22,460,793 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#1,086
of 8,182 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,087
of 447,296 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#92
of 533 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,460,793 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,182 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 447,296 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 533 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.