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Which green way: description of the intervention for mobilising against Aedes aegypti under difficult security conditions in southern Mexico

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, May 2017
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Title
Which green way: description of the intervention for mobilising against Aedes aegypti under difficult security conditions in southern Mexico
Published in
BMC Public Health, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4300-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Arcadio Morales-Perez, Elizabeth Nava-Aguilera, José Legorreta-Soberanis, Sergio Paredes-Solís, Alejandro Balanzar-Martínez, Felipe René Serrano-de los Santos, Claudia Erika Ríos-Rivera, Jaime García-Leyva, Robert J. Ledogar, Anne Cockcroft, Neil Andersson

Abstract

Community mobilisation for prevention requires engagement with and buy in from those communities. In the Mexico state of Guerrero, unprecedented social violence related to the narcotics trade has eroded most community structures. A recent randomised controlled trial in 90 coastal communities achieved sufficient mobilisation to reduce conventional vector density indicators, self-reported dengue illness and serologically proved dengue virus infection. The Camino Verde intervention was a participatory research protocol promoting local discussion of baseline evidence and co-design of vector control solutions. Training of facilitators emphasised community authorship rather than trying to convince communities to do specific activities. Several discussion groups in each intervention community generated a loose and evolving prevention plan. Facilitators trained brigadistas, the first wave of whom received a small monthly stipend. Increasing numbers of volunteers joined the effort without pay. All communities opted to work with schoolchildren and for house-to-house visits by brigadístas. Children joined the neighbourhood vector control movements where security conditions permitted. After 6 months, a peer evaluation involved brigadista visits between intervention communities to review and to share progress. Although most communities had no active social institutions at the outset, local action planning using survey data provided a starting point for community authorship. Well-known in their own communities, brigadistas faced little security risk compared with the facilitators who visited the communities, or with governmental programmes. We believe the training focus on evidence-based dialogue and a plural community ownership through multiple design groups were key to success under challenging security conditions. ISRCTN27581154 .

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 104 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 104 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 14%
Student > Master 14 13%
Student > Bachelor 12 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 10%
Other 8 8%
Other 16 15%
Unknown 29 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 15 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 13%
Social Sciences 9 9%
Psychology 8 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 5%
Other 23 22%
Unknown 30 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 January 2018.
All research outputs
#10,971,971
of 12,380,418 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#7,863
of 8,376 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#292,896
of 351,891 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#277
of 298 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,380,418 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,376 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 351,891 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 298 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.