↓ Skip to main content

Pattern of drug utilization for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in urban Ghana following national treatment policy change to artemisinin-combination therapy

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, January 2009
Altmetric Badge

Citations

dimensions_citation
57 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
137 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Pattern of drug utilization for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in urban Ghana following national treatment policy change to artemisinin-combination therapy
Published in
Malaria Journal, January 2009
DOI 10.1186/1475-2875-8-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexander NO Dodoo, Carole Fogg, Alex Asiimwe, Edmund T Nartey, Augustina Kodua, Ofori Tenkorang, David Ofori-Adjei

Abstract

Change of first-line treatment of uncomplicated malaria to artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT) is widespread in Africa. To expand knowledge of safety profiles of ACT, pharmacovigilance activities are included in the implementation process of therapy changes. Ghana implemented first-line therapy of artesunate-amodiaquine in 2005. Drug utilization data is an important component of determining drug safety, and this paper describes how anti-malarials were prescribed within a prospective pharmacovigilance study in Ghana following anti-malarial treatment policy change.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 137 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Nigeria 1 <1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 <1%
Unknown 130 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 26 19%
Researcher 20 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 13%
Student > Postgraduate 11 8%
Other 10 7%
Other 37 27%
Unknown 15 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 56 41%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 14 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 7%
Social Sciences 7 5%
Other 21 15%
Unknown 21 15%