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A case of herbicide-induced acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pulmonary Medicine, December 2017
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1 tweeter

Citations

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Readers on

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16 Mendeley
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Title
A case of herbicide-induced acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia?
Published in
BMC Pulmonary Medicine, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12890-017-0547-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shengsong Chen, Hong Zhou, Lingling Yu, Bo Tong, Zuke Xiao, Sisi Fan

Abstract

To improve the understanding of acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP), we present one case of AFOP proven by percutaneous lung biopsy along with clinical features, chest imaging and pathology. A 50-year-old man was admitted to our department after he was given empiric therapy for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The clinical symptoms of the patient were dry cough, chills, night sweats and high fevers. Chest computed tomography (CT) scan showed a high-density shadow in the right lung lobe, similar to lobular pneumonia. The patient was preliminarily diagnosed with community-acquired pneumonia; however, antibacterial treatment was ineffective. To confirm the diagnosis, we performed bronchoscopy and percutaneous lung biopsy; pathology was consistent with AFOP. After he was treated with glucocorticoids, the patient's symptoms were relieved, and the shadow seen on imaging dissipated during the follow-up period. AFOP is a rare histopathological diagnosis that can be easily misdiagnosed. Clinicians need to consider the possibility of AFOP in the case of invalid antibacterial therapy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 19%
Student > Bachelor 3 19%
Other 2 13%
Researcher 2 13%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 63%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 6%
Engineering 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 January 2018.
All research outputs
#10,968,742
of 12,372,723 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pulmonary Medicine
#782
of 935 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#293,287
of 352,271 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pulmonary Medicine
#93
of 117 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,723 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 935 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 352,271 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 117 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.