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Effects of pre-notification, invitation length, questionnaire length and reminder on participation rate: a quasi-randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Research Methodology, January 2018
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Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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36 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of pre-notification, invitation length, questionnaire length and reminder on participation rate: a quasi-randomised controlled trial
Published in
BMC Medical Research Methodology, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12874-017-0467-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marie Koitsalu, Martin Eklund, Jan Adolfsson, Henrik Grönberg, Yvonne Brandberg

Abstract

Improving participation rates in epidemiologic studies using questionnaires and biological sampling is important for the generalizability of the outcome. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of pre-notification, invitation length, questionnaire length, and reminder on participation rate and to investigate whether some factors contributed to participants doing both the questionnaire and blood sampling as oppose to only one part. Our study was embedded within the pilot testing of a large population-based study about prostate cancer screening. Our study sample consisted of 28.134 men between 50 and 69 years of age and living in the region of Stockholm (Sweden) invited to respond to a web-based questionnaire and to provide blood for prostate cancer testing. The men were randomly allocated according to birth of date to receive either: (a) a pre-notification postcard or not; (b) a shorter or a longer invitation letter; (c) a shorter or a longer web-based questionnaire, and (d) a reminder or not. The effects of the survey design factors were tested using chi-square. The use of a pre-notification (p < 0.0001), a longer questionnaire (p = 0.004) and the use of a reminder (p = 0.02) were associated with an increase in overall participation, i.e. responding to the questionnaire or providing blood for PCT or performing both components. The results of this pilot study justified the use of a pre-notification and a reminder in the following large population based study since the benefits of increased participation traded off against the greater costs incurred. Furthermore, we were able to use the longer version of the questionnaire, which allowed us to collect more information without risking a lower response rate.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 17%
Student > Bachelor 5 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Researcher 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 8 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 11%
Psychology 3 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 8%
Computer Science 3 8%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 13 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 March 2018.
All research outputs
#7,966,520
of 12,701,041 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Research Methodology
#817
of 1,139 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#215,326
of 383,191 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Research Methodology
#94
of 145 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,701,041 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,139 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 383,191 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 145 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.