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Attributable causes of colorectal cancer in China

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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69 Dimensions

Readers on

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88 Mendeley
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Title
Attributable causes of colorectal cancer in China
Published in
BMC Cancer, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12885-017-3968-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Meng-Jia Gu, Qiu-Chi Huang, Cheng-Zhen Bao, Ying-Jun Li, Xiao-Qin Li, Ding Ye, Zhen-Hua Ye, Kun Chen, Jian-Bing Wang

Abstract

Colorectal cancer is the 4th common cancer in China. Most colorectal cancers are due to modifiable lifestyle factors, but few studies have provided a systematic evidence-based assessment of the burden of colorectal cancer incidence and mortality attributable to the known risk factors in China. We estimated the population attributable faction (PAF) for each selected risk factor in China, based on the prevalence of exposure around 2000 and relative risks from cohort studies and meta-analyses. Among 245,000 new cases and 139,000 deaths of colorectal cancer in China in 2012, we found that 115,578 incident cases and 63,102 deaths of colorectal cancer were attributable to smoking, alcohol drinking, overweight and obesity, physical inactivity and dietary factors. Low vegetable intake was the main risk factor for colorectal cancer with a PAF of 17.9%. Physical inactivity was responsible for 8.9% of colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. The remaining factors, including high red and processed meat intake, low fruit intake, alcohol drinking, overweight/obesity and smoking, accounted for 8.6%, 6.4%, 5.4%, 5.3% and 4.9% of colorectal cancer, respectively. Overall, 45.5% of colorectal cancer incidence and mortality were attributable to the joint effects of these seven risk factors. Tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, overweight or obesity, physical inactivity, low vegetable intake, low fruit intake, and high red and processed meat intake were responsible for nearly 46% of colorectal cancer incidence and mortality in China in 2012. Our findings could provide a basis for developing guidelines of colorectal cancer prevention and control in China.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 88 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 22%
Student > Bachelor 16 18%
Researcher 9 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 9%
Student > Postgraduate 5 6%
Other 8 9%
Unknown 23 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 10%
Social Sciences 5 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 5%
Other 11 13%
Unknown 24 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 June 2021.
All research outputs
#10,859,817
of 18,917,096 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#2,415
of 6,857 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#197,808
of 424,020 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#183
of 522 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,917,096 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,857 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 424,020 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 522 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.