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Could Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis cause Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis…and colorectal cancer?

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Agents and Cancer, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
55 Mendeley
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Title
Could Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis cause Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis…and colorectal cancer?
Published in
Infectious Agents and Cancer, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13027-017-0172-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ellen S. Pierce

Abstract

Infectious agents are known causes of human cancers. Schistosoma japonicum and Schistosoma mansoni cause a percentage of colorectal cancers in countries where the respective Schistosoma species are prevalent. Colorectal cancer is a complication of ulcerative colitis and colonic Crohn's disease, the two main forms of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IIBD). Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the cause of a chronic intestinal disease in domestic and wild ruminants, is one suspected cause of IIBD. MAP may therefore be involved in the pathogenesis of IIBD-associated colorectal cancer as well as colorectal cancer in individuals without IIBD (sporadic colorectal cancer) in countries where MAP infection of domestic livestock is prevalent and MAP's presence in soil and water is extensive. MAP organisms have been identified in the intestines of patients with sporadic colorectal cancer and IIBD when high magnification, oil immersion light microscopy (×1000 total magnification rather than the usual ×400 total magnification) is used. Research has demonstrated MAP's ability to invade intestinal goblet cells and cause acute and chronic goblet cell hyperplasia. Goblet cell hyperplasia is the little-recognized initial pathologic lesion of sporadic colorectal cancer, referred to as transitional mucosa, aberrant crypt foci, goblet cell hyperplastic polyps or transitional polyps. It is the even lesser-recognized initial pathologic feature of IIBD, referred to as hypermucinous mucosa, hyperplastic-like mucosal change, serrated epithelial changes, flat serrated changes, goblet cell rich mucosa or epithelial hyperplasia. Goblet cell hyperplasia is the precursor lesion of adenomas and dysplasia in the classical colorectal cancer pathway, of sessile serrated adenomas and serrated dysplasia in the serrated colorectal cancer pathway, and of flat and elevated dysplasia and dysplasia-associated lesions or masses in IIBD-associated intestinal cancers. MAP's invasion of intestinal goblet cells may result in the initial pathologic lesion of IIBD and sporadic colorectal cancer. MAP's persistence in infected intestines may result in the eventual development of both IIBD-associated and sporadic colorectal cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 55 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 25%
Student > Master 7 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 9%
Other 5 9%
Other 9 16%
Unknown 10 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 11 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 7%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 11 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 November 2019.
All research outputs
#3,920,829
of 16,669,654 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Agents and Cancer
#53
of 387 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,928
of 412,484 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Agents and Cancer
#5
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,669,654 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 387 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 412,484 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.