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Training the salmon’s genes: influence of aerobic exercise, swimming performance and selection on gene expression in Atlantic salmon

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, December 2017
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1 tweeter

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53 Mendeley
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Title
Training the salmon’s genes: influence of aerobic exercise, swimming performance and selection on gene expression in Atlantic salmon
Published in
BMC Genomics, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12864-017-4361-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicholas A. Robinson, Gerrit Timmerhaus, Matthew Baranski, Øivind Andersen, Harald Takle, Aleksei Krasnov

Abstract

Farmed and wild Atlantic salmon are exposed to many infectious and non-infectious challenges that can cause mortality when they enter the sea. Exercise before transfer promotes growth, health and survival in the sea. Swimming performance in juveniles at the freshwater parr stage is positively associated with resistance to some diseases. Genetic variation is likely to affect response to exercise. In this study we map genetic differences associated with aerobic exercise, swimming performance and genetic origin. Eggs from the selectively bred Bolaks salmon and wild Lærdal River salmon strains were reared until parr in a common environment. Swimming performance was assessed by subjecting the fish to either continuous hard exercise or control conditions for 18 days. Heart was sampled for examination of gene expression using RNA-seq (~60 fish/treatment). Lower expression of genes affecting immune function was found in domesticated than wild parr. Among wild parr under control exercise the expression of a large number of genes involved in general metabolism, stress and immune response was lower in superior swimmers suggesting that minimisation of energy expenditure during periods of low activity makes parr better able to sustain bursts of swimming for predator avoidance. A similar set of genes were down-regulated with training among wild parr with inferior swimming performance. These parr react to training in a way that their cardiac expression patterns become like the superior performing wild parr under control exercise conditions. Diversifying selection caused by breeding of domesticated stock, and adaptive pressures in wild stock, has affected the expression and frequency of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for multiple functional groups of genes affecting diverse processes. SNPs associated with swimming performance in wild parr map to genes involved in energetic processes, coding for contractile filaments in the muscle and controlling cell proliferation. Domesticated parr have less phenotypic plasticity in response to training and lower expression of genes with functions affecting immune response. The genetic response to training is complex and depends on the background of parr and their swimming ability. Exercise should be tailored to the genetics and swimming performance of fish.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 53 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 23%
Student > Bachelor 11 21%
Student > Master 8 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 4%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 15 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 30%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 8%
Environmental Science 3 6%
Sports and Recreations 3 6%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 19 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 January 2018.
All research outputs
#7,750,575
of 12,352,780 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#4,621
of 7,283 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#199,337
of 354,944 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#478
of 815 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,352,780 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,283 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 354,944 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 815 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.