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Human echinostomiasis: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, January 2018
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1 tweeter

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Title
Human echinostomiasis: a case report
Published in
BMC Research Notes, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13104-018-3133-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ranjit Sah, Shusila Khadka, Rabin Hamal, Sagar Poudyal

Abstract

Echinostomiasis is a food-borne infection caused by an intestinal trematodes belonging to the family Echinostomatidae. They infect the gastrointestinal tract of humans. Patients are usually asymptomatic. However, with heavy infections, the worms can produce catarrhal inflammation with mild ulceration and the patient may experience abdominal pain, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and weight loss. Infection are associated with common sociocultural practices of eating raw or insufficiently cooked mollusks and fish. We report a first case of echinostomiasis from Nepal in a 62 years old, hindu male who presented to Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital, Kathmandu with a complaint of abdominal pain and distension with vomiting on and off for 3-4 months. He had history of consumption of insufficiently cooked fish and snail with alcohol. During endoscopy, an adult flat worm was seen with mild portal hypertensive gastropathy (McCormack's classification) and erosive duodenopathy. The adult worm was identified as Echinostoma species based on its morphology and characteristic ova found on stool routine microscopic examination of the patient. Patient was treated with praziquantel 40 mg/kg (single dose) which is the drug of choice for Echinostoma species infection by which he got improved and on follow up stool examination after 2 weeks revealed no ova of Echinostoma species. The patients having history of consumption of insufficiently cooked snail and fish with suggestive clinical features of echinostomiasis should be suspected by physicians and ova of Echinostoma species should be searched by trained microscopists. An epidemiological survey is required to know the exact burden of Echinostoma species infection in the place where people have habit of eating insufficiently cooked fish and snails, as it can be endemic in that community or geographical area.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 38%
Student > Bachelor 6 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 21%
Researcher 3 13%
Unknown 1 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 17%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 February 2018.
All research outputs
#7,810,982
of 12,448,635 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#1,410
of 2,798 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#209,214
of 372,216 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#101
of 277 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,448,635 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,798 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 372,216 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 277 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.