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Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, January 2005
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
74 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
70 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Published in
BMC Biology, January 2005
DOI 10.1186/1741-7007-3-22
Pubmed ID
Authors

Monique Turmel, Christian Otis, Claude Lemieux

Abstract

The Streptophyta comprise all land plants and six monophyletic groups of charophycean green algae. Phylogenetic analyses of four genes from three cellular compartments support the following branching order for these algal lineages: Mesostigmatales, Chlorokybales, Klebsormidiales, Zygnematales, Coleochaetales and Charales, with the last lineage being sister to land plants. Comparative analyses of the Mesostigma viride (Mesostigmatales) and land plant chloroplast genome sequences revealed that this genome experienced many gene losses, intron insertions and gene rearrangements during the evolution of charophyceans. On the other hand, the chloroplast genome of Chaetosphaeridium globosum (Coleochaetales) is highly similar to its land plant counterparts in terms of gene content, intron composition and gene order, indicating that most of the features characteristic of land plant chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) were acquired from charophycean green algae. To gain further insight into when the highly conservative pattern displayed by land plant cpDNAs originated in the Streptophyta, we have determined the cpDNA sequences of the distantly related zygnematalean algae Staurastrum punctulatum and Zygnema circumcarinatum.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 3%
Germany 2 3%
Canada 1 1%
Colombia 1 1%
Pakistan 1 1%
New Zealand 1 1%
Mexico 1 1%
Czechia 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 59 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 23%
Researcher 13 19%
Professor 9 13%
Student > Master 9 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 10%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 4 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 48 69%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 14%
Environmental Science 2 3%
Linguistics 1 1%
Unspecified 1 1%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 4 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2010.
All research outputs
#816,456
of 3,629,479 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#339
of 574 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,718
of 94,945 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#16
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,629,479 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 63rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 574 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 94,945 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.