↓ Skip to main content

Traditional use of the Andean flicker (Colaptes rupicola) as a galactagogue in the Peruvian Andes

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, May 2006
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

wikipedia
4 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
71 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Traditional use of the Andean flicker (Colaptes rupicola) as a galactagogue in the Peruvian Andes
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, May 2006
DOI 10.1186/1746-4269-2-23
Pubmed ID
Authors

Steve Froemming

Abstract

This paper explores the use of the dried meat and feathers of the Andean Flicker (Colaptes rupicola) to increase the milk supply of nursing women and domestic animals in the Andes. The treatment is of preColumbian origin, but continues to be used in some areas, including the village in the southern Peruvian highlands where I do ethnographic research. I explore the factors giving rise to and sustaining the practice, relate it to other galactagogues used in the Andes and to the use of birds in ethnomedical and ethnoveterinary treatments in general, and situate it within the general tendency in the Andes and elsewhere to replicate human relations in the treatment of valuable livestock. The bird's use as a galactagogue appears to be motivated by both metaphorical associations and its perceived efficacy, and conceptually blends human and animal healthcare domains.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Germany 1 1%
Israel 1 1%
India 1 1%
Peru 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Argentina 1 1%
Mexico 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
Other 1 1%
Unknown 60 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 23%
Student > Master 8 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Professor 5 7%
Other 20 28%
Unknown 11 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 27%
Social Sciences 9 13%
Environmental Science 7 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 13 18%
Unknown 14 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 February 2022.
All research outputs
#7,451,584
of 22,780,967 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#320
of 733 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,092
of 65,998 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#2
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,780,967 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 733 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 65,998 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.