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RCC2 over-expression in tumor cells alters apoptosis and drug sensitivity by regulating Rac1 activation

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, January 2018
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4 tweeters

Citations

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28 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
RCC2 over-expression in tumor cells alters apoptosis and drug sensitivity by regulating Rac1 activation
Published in
BMC Cancer, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12885-017-3908-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nan Wu, Dong Ren, Su Li, Wenli Ma, Shaoyan Hu, Yan Jin, Sheng Xiao

Abstract

Small GTP binding protein Rac1 is a component of NADPH oxidases and is essential for superoxide-induced cell death. Rac1 is activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), and this activation can be blocked by regulator of chromosome condensation 2 (RCC2), which binds the switch regions of Rac1 to prevent access from GEFs. Three cancer cell lines with up- or down-regulation of RCC2 were used to evaluate cell proliferation, apoptosis, Rac1 signaling and sensitivity to a group of nine chemotherapeutic drugs. RCC2 expression in lung cancer and ovarian cancer were studied using immunochemistry stain of tumor tissue arrays. Forced RCC2 expression in tumor cells blocked spontaneous- or Staurosporine (STS)-induced apoptosis. In contrast, RCC2 knock down in these cells resulted in increased apoptosis to STS treatment. The protective activity of RCC2 on apoptosis was revoked by a constitutively activated Rac1, confirming a role of RCC2 in apoptosis by regulating Rac1. In an immunohistochemistry evaluation of tissue microarray, RCC2 was over-expressed in 88.3% of primary lung cancer and 65.2% of ovarian cancer as compared to non-neoplastic lung and ovarian tissues, respectively. Because chemotherapeutic drugs can kill tumor cells by activating Rac1/JNK pathway, we suspect that tumors with RCC2 overexpression would be more resistant to these drugs. Tumor cells with forced RCC2 expression indeed had significant difference in drug sensitivity compared to parental cells using a panel of common chemotherapeutic drugs. RCC2 regulates apoptosis by blocking Rac1 signaling. RCC2 expression in tumor can be a useful marker for predicting chemotherapeutic response.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 29%
Researcher 5 16%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 7 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 23%
Psychology 3 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 8 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 April 2021.
All research outputs
#12,758,988
of 20,629,552 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#2,988
of 7,406 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#232,238
of 435,653 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#218
of 526 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,629,552 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,406 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 435,653 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 526 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.