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Using the canary genome to decipher the evolution of hormone-sensitive gene regulation in seasonal singing birds

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Biology (Online Edition), January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
17 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
54 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
86 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Using the canary genome to decipher the evolution of hormone-sensitive gene regulation in seasonal singing birds
Published in
Genome Biology (Online Edition), January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13059-014-0578-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carolina Frankl-Vilches, Heiner Kuhl, Martin Werber, Sven Klages, Martin Kerick, Antje Bakker, Edivaldo HC de Oliveira, Christina Reusch, Floriana Capuano, Jakob Vowinckel, Stefan Leitner, Markus Ralser, Bernd Timmermann, Manfred Gahr

Abstract

BackgroundWhile the song of all songbirds is controlled by the same neural circuit, the hormone dependence of singing behavior varies greatly between species. For this reason, songbirds are ideal organisms to study ultimate and proximate mechanisms of hormone-dependent behavior and neuronal plasticity.ResultsWe present the high quality assembly and annotation of a female 1.2-Gbp canary genome. Whole genome alignments between the canary and 13 genomes throughout the bird taxa show a much-conserved synteny, whereas at the single-base resolution there are considerable species differences. These differences impact small sequence motifs like transcription factor binding sites such as estrogen response elements and androgen response elements. To relate these species-specific response elements to the hormone-sensitivity of the canary singing behavior, we identify seasonal testosterone-sensitive transcriptomes of major song related brain regions, HVC and RA, and find the seasonal gene networks related to neuronal differentiation only in the HVC. Testosterone-sensitive up-regulated gene networks of HVC of singing males concerned neuronal differentiation. Among the testosterone-regulated genes of canary HVC, 20% lack estrogen response elements and 4-8% lack androgen response elements in orthologous promoters in the zebra finch.ConclusionThe canary genome sequence and complementary expression analysis reveal intra-regional evolutionary changes in a multi-regional neural circuit controlling seasonal singing behavior and identify gene evolution related to the hormone-sensitivity of this seasonal singing behavior. Such genes that are testosterone- and estrogen-sensitive specifically in the canary and that are involved in rewiring of neurons might be crucial for seasonal re-differentiation of HVC underlying seasonal song patterning.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 86 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Portugal 1 1%
Denmark 1 1%
France 1 1%
Unknown 82 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 33%
Researcher 16 19%
Student > Master 11 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 8%
Professor 2 2%
Other 8 9%
Unknown 14 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 41 48%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 17%
Neuroscience 10 12%
Environmental Science 1 1%
Computer Science 1 1%
Other 5 6%
Unknown 13 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 46. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 January 2018.
All research outputs
#595,635
of 18,394,878 outputs
Outputs from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#492
of 3,718 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,242
of 302,293 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#2
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,394,878 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,718 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 302,293 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 8 of them.