↓ Skip to main content

Avian malaria parasites in the last supper: identifying encounters between parasites and the invasive Asian mosquito tiger and native mosquito species in Italy

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, January 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
44 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
92 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Avian malaria parasites in the last supper: identifying encounters between parasites and the invasive Asian mosquito tiger and native mosquito species in Italy
Published in
Malaria Journal, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0571-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Josué Martínez-de la Puente, Joaquín Muñoz, Gioia Capelli, Fabrizio Montarsi, Ramón Soriguer, Daniele Arnoldi, Annapaola Rizzoli, Jordi Figuerola

Abstract

BackgroundThe invasive Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus has dramatically expanded its distribution range, being catalogued as one of the world¿s 100 worst invasive alien species. As vectors of pathogens, Ae. albopictus may create novel epidemiological scenarios in the invaded areas.MethodsHere, the frequency of encounters of Ae. albopictus with the avian malaria parasite Plasmodium and the related Haemoproteus was studied in an area with established populations in northeastern Italy and compared with those from four native mosquito species, Anopheles maculipennis s.l., Culex hortensis, Culex pipiens, and Ochlerotatus caspius. The abdomens of mosquitoes with a recent blood meal were used to identify both the blood meal source and the parasites harboured.Results Aedes albopictus had a clear antropophilic behaviour while An. maculipennis and Oc. caspius fed mainly on non-human mammals. Birds were the most common hosts of Cx. pipiens and reptiles of Cx. hortensis. Parasites were isolated from three mosquito species, with Cx. pipiens (30%) showing the highest parasite prevalence followed by Cx. hortensis (9%) and Ae. albopictus (5%).ConclusionsThese results are the first identifying the avian malaria parasites harboured by mosquitoes in Italy and represent the first evidence supporting that, although Ae. albopictus could be involved in the transmission of avian malaria parasites, the risk of avian malaria parasite spread by this invasive mosquito in Europe would be minimal.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Lithuania 1 1%
Portugal 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Unknown 88 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 27 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 21%
Student > Master 10 11%
Student > Bachelor 10 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 5%
Other 11 12%
Unknown 10 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 44 48%
Environmental Science 7 8%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 6 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 4%
Other 10 11%
Unknown 16 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 October 2016.
All research outputs
#3,675,455
of 15,265,759 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,029
of 4,346 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,844
of 286,357 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#5
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,265,759 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,346 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,357 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.