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High frequency percussive ventilation increases alveolar recruitment in early acute respiratory distress syndrome: an experimental, physiological and CT scan study

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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48 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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43 Mendeley
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Title
High frequency percussive ventilation increases alveolar recruitment in early acute respiratory distress syndrome: an experimental, physiological and CT scan study
Published in
Critical Care, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13054-017-1924-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas Godet, Matthieu Jabaudon, Raïko Blondonnet, Aymeric Tremblay, Jules Audard, Benjamin Rieu, Bruno Pereira, Jean-Marc Garcier, Emmanuel Futier, Jean-Michel Constantin

Abstract

High frequency percussive ventilation (HFPV) combines diffusive (high frequency mini-bursts) and convective ventilation patterns. Benefits include enhanced oxygenation and hemodynamics, and alveolar recruitment, while providing hypothetic lung-protective ventilation. No study has investigated HFPV-induced changes in lung aeration in patients with early acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Eight patients with early non-focal ARDS were enrolled and five swine with early non-focal ARDS were studied in prospective computed tomography (CT) scan and animal studies, in a university-hospital tertiary ICU and an animal laboratory. Patients were optimized under conventional "open-lung" ventilation. Lung CT was performed using an end-expiratory hold (Conv) to assess lung morphology. HFPV was applied for 1 hour to all patients before new CT scans were performed with end-expiratory (HFPV EE) and end-inspiratory (HFPV EI) holds. Lung volumes were determined after software analysis. At specified time points, blood gases and hemodynamic data were collected. Recruitment was defined as a change in non-aerated lung volumes between Conv, HFPV EE and HFPV EI. The main objective was to verify whether HFPV increases alveolar recruitment without lung hyperinflation. Correlation between pleural, upper airways and HFPV-derived pressures was assessed in an ARDS swine-based model. One-hour HFPV significantly improved oxygenation and hemodynamics. Lung recruitment significantly rose by 12.0% (8.5-18.0%), P = 0.05 (Conv-HFPV EE) and 12.5% (9.3-16.8%), P = 0.003 (Conv-HFPV EI). Hyperinflation tended to increase by 2.0% (0.5-2.5%), P = 0.89 (Conv-HFPV EE) and 3.0% (2.5-4.0%), P = 0.27 (Conv-HFPV EI). HFPV hyperinflation correlated with hyperinflated and normally-aerated lung volumes at baseline: r = 0.79, P = 0.05 and r = 0.79, P = 0.05, respectively (Conv-HFPV EE); and only hyperinflated lung volumes at baseline: r = 0.88, P = 0.01 (Conv-HFPV EI). HFPV CT-determined tidal volumes reached 5.7 (1.1-8.1) mL.kg-1 of ideal body weight (IBW). Correlations between pleural and HFPV-monitored pressures were acceptable and end-inspiratory pleural pressures remained below 25cmH20. HFPV improves alveolar recruitment, gas exchanges and hemodynamics of patients with early non-focal ARDS without relevant hyperinflation. HFPV-derived pressures correlate with corresponding pleural or upper airways pressures. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02510105 . Registered on 1 June 2015. The trial was retrospectively registered.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 48 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 7 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Researcher 4 9%
Professor 4 9%
Lecturer 3 7%
Other 9 21%
Unknown 12 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 49%
Engineering 3 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Unspecified 2 5%
Mathematics 1 2%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 10 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2019.
All research outputs
#1,109,412
of 21,342,732 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#997
of 5,805 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,308
of 497,776 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#90
of 212 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,342,732 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,805 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 497,776 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 212 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.