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Patient blood management programs: how to spread the word?

Overview of attention for article published in Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
24 Mendeley
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Title
Patient blood management programs: how to spread the word?
Published in
Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13584-018-0204-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shoshana Revel-Vilk, Mira Naamad

Abstract

Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions save lives and improve health; however, unnecessary transfusion practice exposes patients to immediate and long-term negative consequences. Indirect consequences of unnecessary transfusions are the reduced availability of RBC units for patients who are in need. Accumulating evidence shows that restricting RBC transfusions improves outcomes and current guidelines suggest limiting RBC transfusion to the minimum number of units required to relieve symptoms of anemia or to return the patient to a safe hemoglobin range (7-8 g/dl in stable, non-cardiac inpatients). Still, studies show that there is over-utilization of RBC transfusion, partly due to low level of knowledge of physicians regarding restrictive RBC transfusion policy across a broad range of professions and specialties. Patient blood management (PBM) programs have been developed to promote clear hospital transfusion guidelines, strive for optimization of patient hemoglobin and iron stores and, most importantly, improve education regarding restrictive RBC policy. Understanding what and where the gaps of knowledge are, as was done in the study by Dr. Koren and his colleagues, is an important step for developing effective PBM programs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 25%
Unspecified 3 13%
Other 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 13%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 21%
Unspecified 3 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 4 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 December 2019.
All research outputs
#8,745,360
of 16,322,459 outputs
Outputs from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#121
of 463 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#195,309
of 463,526 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#16
of 68 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,322,459 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 463 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 463,526 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 68 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.