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Anatomy of the sacroiliac joints in children and adolescents by computed tomography

Overview of attention for article published in Pediatric Rheumatology, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
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4 Facebook pages

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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21 Mendeley
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Title
Anatomy of the sacroiliac joints in children and adolescents by computed tomography
Published in
Pediatric Rheumatology, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12969-017-0210-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna Zejden, Anne Grethe Jurik

Abstract

Diagnosing sacroiliitis by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children/adolescents can be difficult due to the growth-related changes. This study analyzed the normal osseous anatomy of the sacroiliac joints (SIJ) in a juvenile population using computed tomography (CT). The anatomy of the SIJ was retrospectively analyzed in 124 trauma patients aged 9 months - <18 years by CT, based on 2 mm slices in axial, semi-axial and semi-coronal planes. The following anatomical features were recorded: intersegmental fusion of the sacral vertebral segments 1-3 (S1-S3), ossified nuclei (antero-superior at S1, lateral to the intervertebral spaces and lateral to S1 and S2) and joint facet defects larger than 3 mm. Fusion of S1/S2 started at the age of 6 years and was complete after the age of 13 years in most girls and after the age of 14 years in most boys. Fusion of S2/S3 started at the age of 9 years, but could remain incomplete up to 18 years in both genders. Ossified nuclei antero-lateral at S1 and/or in the joint space were observed until the age of 18 years and occurred in 77% of individuals ≥13 years with intraarticular localization in 64% of girls and 60% of boys. Joint facet defects >3 mm occurred in 21 children/adolescents (17%) located to both the iliac and sacral joint facets. Normal osseous SIJ structures in children and adolescents vary considerably. Attention to these normal anatomical structures during growth may help to avoid false positive findings by MRI.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor > Associate Professor 4 19%
Other 3 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Researcher 2 10%
Other 5 24%
Unknown 2 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 71%
Psychology 3 14%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Unknown 2 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 April 2018.
All research outputs
#8,298,109
of 15,077,865 outputs
Outputs from Pediatric Rheumatology
#207
of 448 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#157,829
of 361,885 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pediatric Rheumatology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,077,865 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 448 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 361,885 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them