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Preventing suicidal behaviours with a multilevel intervention: a cluster randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, January 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
40 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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100 Mendeley
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Title
Preventing suicidal behaviours with a multilevel intervention: a cluster randomised controlled trial
Published in
BMC Public Health, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5032-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sunny Collings, Gabrielle Jenkin, James Stanley, Sarah McKenzie, Simon Hatcher

Abstract

In the context of the recent surge in community based multilevel interventions for suicide prevention, all of which show promising results, we discuss the implications of the findings of such an intervention designed for and implemented in New Zealand. The multi-level intervention for suicide prevention in New Zealand (MISP-NZ) was a cluster randomised controlled community intervention trial involving eight hospital regions matched into four pairs and randomised to either the intervention or practice as usual (the control). Intervention regions received 25 months of interventions (01 June 2010 to 30 June 2012) including: 1) training in recognition of suicide risk factors; 2) workshops on mental health issues; 3) community based interventions (linking in with community events); and 4) distribution of print material and information on web-based resources. There was no significant difference between the change in rate of suicidal behaviours (ISH or self-inflicted deaths) in the intervention group compared with the control group (rate ratio = 1.07, 95% CI 0.82, 1.38). This study did not provide substantive evidence that the MISP-NZ intervention had an effect on suicidal behaviours raising important questions about the potential effectiveness of the multilevel intervention model for suicide prevention for all countries. Although a range of factors may account for this unanticipated finding, including inadequate study power, differences in design and intervention focus, and country-specific contextual factors, it is possible that the effectiveness of the multilevel intervention model for reducing suicidal behaviours may have been overstated. This trial was retrospectively registered on 11 April 2013. ACTRN12613000399796 .

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 40 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 100 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 100 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 14%
Student > Bachelor 14 14%
Student > Master 12 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 12 12%
Unknown 32 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 21 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 12%
Social Sciences 8 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 2%
Other 5 5%
Unknown 34 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 May 2018.
All research outputs
#1,310,068
of 22,324,089 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#1,424
of 14,477 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,405
of 402,828 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,324,089 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,477 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 402,828 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them