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Community-based educational intervention to limit the dissemination of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureusin Northern Saskatchewan, Canada

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, January 2012
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
51 Mendeley
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Title
Community-based educational intervention to limit the dissemination of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureusin Northern Saskatchewan, Canada
Published in
BMC Public Health, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-12-15
Pubmed ID
Authors

George R Golding, Brian Quinn, Kirsten Bergstrom, Donna Stockdale, Shirley Woods, Mandiangu Nsungu, Barb Brooke, Paul N Levett, Greg Horsman, Ryan McDonald, Brian Szklarczuk, Steve Silcox, Shirley Paton, Mary Carson, Michael R Mulvey, James Irvine

Abstract

Surveillance examining the incidence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) was conducted over 8 years beginning in 2001 in three health regions covering the northern half of Saskatchewan. The annual rate of individuals reported with CA-MRSA infection in these regions dramatically increased from 8.2 per 10,000 population in 2001 (range to 4.4-10.1 per 10,000) to 168.1 per 10,000 in 2006 (range 43.4-230.9 per 10,000). To address this issue, a team of community members, healthcare professionals, educators and research scientists formed a team called "the Northern Antibiotic Resistance Partnership" (NARP) to develop physician, patient, community, and school based educational materials in an attempt to limit the spread of CA-MRSA.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 2 4%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 48 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 18%
Researcher 7 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 14%
Student > Master 6 12%
Other 5 10%
Other 11 22%
Unknown 6 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 8%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 11 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 October 2014.
All research outputs
#983,645
of 4,348,929 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#1,964
of 4,993 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,308
of 142,670 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#82
of 163 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,348,929 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 64th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,993 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 142,670 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 163 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.