↓ Skip to main content

Is the likelihood of spousal violence lower or higher among childless women? Evidence from Nigeria demographic and health surveys

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Women's Health, January 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
90 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Is the likelihood of spousal violence lower or higher among childless women? Evidence from Nigeria demographic and health surveys
Published in
BMC Women's Health, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12905-018-0514-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bola Lukman Solanke, Adeleke Luqman Bisiriyu, Amos Oyedokun

Abstract

Few studies have been able to determine whether the likelihood of spousal violence is higher or lower among childless women compared with women who have children. This is because most studies linking childlessness and spousal violence were either qualitative or were conducted among childless women attending fertility clinics. In the fewer quantitative studies that linked childlessness and spousal violence, results are mixed and yet to be verified in Nigeria using nationally representative sample data. The current study addresses this knowledge gap by raising the research question: is the likelihood of spousal violence lower or higher among childless women? The study analysed data from 2008 and 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Surveys. Only women aged 35-49 years are included in the analysis. The outcome variable was spousal violence, while the key explanatory variable was parity status categorised into childless, have only one child, and have two or more children. Selected individual-level and community-level variables were included as additional explanatory variables. The multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression analysis was applied in four nested models using Stata 12. In Model 1, result show 57% more likelihood of spousal violence among women who have two or more children compared with childless women (OR = 1.570: CI: 1.074-2.294). In Model 2, women who have two or more children were 52.3% more likely to experience spousal violence compared with childless women (OR = 1.523; CI: 1.037-2.247). In Model 3, the likelihood of spousal violence was 67.2% higher among women who have two or more children compared with childless women (OR = 1.672; CI: 1.140-2.452). In the full model, women who have two or more children were 50.8% more likely to experience spousal violence compared with childless women (OR = 1.508; CI: 1.077-2.234). The Intra-Class Correlation (ICC) provides evidence to support community contributions to prevalence of spousal violence. The likelihood of spousal violence is lower among childless women in Nigeria. Causes of spousal violence against women cut across individual, family, and community characteristics irrespective of childlessness or number of children. Current Behaviour Change Communication should be strengthened by adequate enforcement of the newly enacted Violence Against Persons (Prohibition) Act of 2015.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 90 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 10%
Researcher 7 8%
Student > Bachelor 5 6%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 32 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 16 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 13%
Psychology 9 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 2%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 33 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 January 2018.
All research outputs
#2,805,488
of 12,379,581 outputs
Outputs from BMC Women's Health
#186
of 685 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#91,300
of 338,869 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Women's Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,379,581 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 685 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 338,869 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them