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Effects of surgery and anesthetic choice on immunosuppression and cancer recurrence

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
138 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
178 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of surgery and anesthetic choice on immunosuppression and cancer recurrence
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12967-018-1389-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ryungsa Kim

Abstract

The relationship between surgery and anesthetic-induced immunosuppression and cancer recurrence remains unresolved. Surgery and anesthesia stimulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) to cause immunosuppression through several tumor-derived soluble factors. The potential impact of surgery and anesthesia on cancer recurrence was reviewed to provide guidance for cancer surgical treatment. PubMed was searched up to December 31, 2016 using search terms such as, "anesthetic technique and cancer recurrence," "regional anesthesia and cancer recurrence," "local anesthesia and cancer recurrence," "anesthetic technique and immunosuppression," and "anesthetic technique and oncologic surgery." Surgery-induced stress responses and surgical manipulation enhance tumor metastasis via release of angiogenic factors and suppression of natural killer (NK) cells and cell-mediated immunity. Intravenous agents such as ketamine and thiopental suppress NK cell activity, whereas propofol does not. Ketamine induces T-lymphocyte apoptosis but midazolam does not affect cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. Volatile anesthetics suppress NK cell activity, induce T-lymphocyte apoptosis, and enhance angiogenesis through hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) activity. Opioids suppress NK cell activity and increase regulatory T cells. Local anesthetics such as lidocaine increase NK cell activity. Anesthetics such as propofol and locoregional anesthesia, which decrease surgery-induced neuroendocrine responses through HPA-axis and SNS suppression, may cause less immunosuppression and recurrence of certain types of cancer compared to volatile anesthetics and opioids.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 178 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 178 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 21 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 11%
Student > Master 20 11%
Student > Bachelor 19 11%
Student > Postgraduate 17 10%
Other 36 20%
Unknown 45 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 79 44%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 14 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 2%
Other 16 9%
Unknown 55 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 December 2019.
All research outputs
#2,153,622
of 21,396,316 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#336
of 3,702 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,698
of 400,348 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,396,316 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,702 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 400,348 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them