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Malaria knowledge and bed net use in three transmission settings in southern Africa

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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32 Dimensions

Readers on

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184 Mendeley
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Title
Malaria knowledge and bed net use in three transmission settings in southern Africa
Published in
Malaria Journal, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2178-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mufaro Kanyangarara, Harry Hamapumbu, Edmore Mamini, James Lupiya, Jennifer C. Stevenson, Sungano Mharakurwa, Mike Chaponda, Philip E. Thuma, Lovemore Gwanzura, Shungu Munyati, Modest Mulenga, Douglas E. Norris, William J. Moss

Abstract

Insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) reduce malaria morbidity and mortality in endemic areas. Despite increasing availability, the use of ITNs remains limited in some settings. Poor malaria knowledge is a barrier to the widespread use of ITNs. The goal of this study was to assess the levels of malaria knowledge and evaluate factors associated with bed net use among individuals residing in three regions of southern Africa with different levels of malaria transmission and control. A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 7535 residents recruited from 2066 households in Mutasa District, Zimbabwe (seasonal malaria transmission), Choma District, Zambia (low transmission) and Nchelenge District, Zambia (high transmission), between March 2012 and March 2017. A standardized questionnaire was used to collect data on demographics, malaria-related knowledge and use of preventive measures. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess determinants of bed net use. Most of the 3836 adult participants correctly linked mosquito bites to malaria (85.0%), mentioned at least one malaria symptom (95.5%) and knew of the benefit of sleeping under an ITN. Bed net ownership and use were highest in Choma and Nchelenge Districts and lowest in Mutasa District. In multivariate analyses, knowledge of ITNs was associated with a 30-40% increased likelihood of bed net use after adjusting for potential confounders across all sites. Other factors significantly associated with bed net use were age, household size and socioeconomic status, although the direction, strength and size of association varied by study site. Importantly, participants aged 5-14 years had reduced odds of sleeping under a bed net compared to children younger than 5 years. Relevant knowledge of ITNs translated into the expected preventive behaviour of sleeping under a bed net, underscoring the need for continued health messaging on malaria prevention. The implementation and delivery of malaria control and elimination interventions needs to consider socioeconomic equity gaps, and target school-age children to ensure access to and improve utilization of ITNs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 184 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 184 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 42 23%
Researcher 21 11%
Student > Bachelor 19 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 5%
Other 29 16%
Unknown 48 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 42 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 24 13%
Social Sciences 15 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 6 3%
Other 26 14%
Unknown 57 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 January 2019.
All research outputs
#6,218,722
of 20,517,972 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,953
of 5,246 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,823
of 393,687 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,517,972 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,246 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 393,687 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them