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Muscle co-contraction in elderly people change due to postural stability during single-leg standing

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Physiological Anthropology, December 2017
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Title
Muscle co-contraction in elderly people change due to postural stability during single-leg standing
Published in
Journal of Physiological Anthropology, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40101-017-0159-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yoshitaka Iwamoto, Makoto Takahashi, Koichi Shinkoda

Abstract

Muscle co-contraction is the simultaneous contraction of agonist and antagonist muscles crossing a joint, and it increases with age. This study primarily aimed to clarify the difference in the effect of a light fingertip contact to stationary surface on postural sway and muscle co-contraction during single-leg standing (SLS) between young and elderly groups; the secondary aim was to reveal the quantitative difference in the muscle co-contraction of the ankle joint among the three different support structure conditions in the elderly group. This study included eight young adults (age 23.4 ± 2.6 years) and nine community dwelling older adults (age 74.7 ± 3.4 years). The task was SLS under the following conditions: (1) no supporting structure, FR; (2) light index fingertip contact to a stationary supporting structure (to touch in force < 1 N), LT; and (3) dependence on a supporting structure for stabilization as desired, DO. Center of pressure (COP) variables [root-mean-square distance (RDIST), total excursion (TOTEX), mean velocity (MVELO), and standard deviation area (AREA-SD)] and the co-contraction index (CI) between the tibialis anterior and soleus were measured using surface electromyography. With regard to the effect of the light fingertip contact to stationary surface, in the young group, TOTEX, MVELO, AREA-SD, and CI during SLS were smaller under the LT condition than under the FR condition. However, in the elderly group, only AREA-SD and CI were smaller under the LT condition than under the FR condition. No significant difference was observed in COP variables and CI under the DO condition between the young and elderly groups. Both young and elderly groups could decrease muscle co-contraction using the light fingertip contact. On the other hand, in the elderly group, COP variables showed a limited effect from the light fingertip contact; only the "sway" domain measure (AREA-SD). Both young and elderly groups showed the smallest CI under the DO condition. Therefore, the elderly group could decrease muscle co-contraction of the ankle joint depending on postural stability.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 57 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 19%
Student > Master 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Researcher 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 9%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 16 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 10 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 16%
Sports and Recreations 8 14%
Neuroscience 5 9%
Engineering 2 4%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 18 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 December 2017.
All research outputs
#10,948,446
of 12,354,690 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#149
of 172 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#282,974
of 338,381 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#4
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,354,690 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 172 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 338,381 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
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