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Single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes encoding penicillin-binding proteins in β-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae in Japan

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
17 Mendeley
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Title
Single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes encoding penicillin-binding proteins in β-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae in Japan
Published in
BMC Research Notes, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13104-018-3169-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kazuhisa Misawa, Norihito Tarumoto, Shinsuke Tamura, Morichika Osa, Takaaki Hamamoto, Atsushi Yuki, Yuji Kouzaki, Kazuo Imai, Runtuwene Lucky Ronald, Toshiyuki Yamaguchi, Takashi Murakami, Shigefumi Maesaki, Yutaka Suzuki, Akihiko Kawana, Takuya Maeda

Abstract

β-Lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae is a common opportunistic pathogen of hospital- and community-acquired infections, harboring multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms in the ftsI gene, which codes for penicillin-binding protein-3. The objectives of this study were to perform comprehensive genetic analyses of whole regions of the penicillin-binding proteins in H. influenzae and to identify additional single nucleotide polymorphisms related to antibiotic resistance, especially to ampicillin and other cephalosporins. In this genome analysis of the ftsI gene in 27 strains of H. influenzae, 10 of 23 (43.5%) specimens of group III genotype β-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae were paradoxically classified as ampicillin-sensitive phenotypes. Unfortunately, we could not identify any novel mutations that were significantly associated with ampicillin minimum inhibitory concentrations in other regions of the penicillin-binding proteins, and we reconfirmed that susceptibility to β-lactam antibiotics was mainly defined by previously reported SNPs in the ftsI gene. We should also consider detailed changes in expression that lead to antibiotic resistance in the future because the acquisition of resistance to antimicrobials can be predicted by the expression levels of a small number of genes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 18%
Other 1 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Student > Master 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 7 41%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 12%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 6%
Other 2 12%
Unknown 5 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 January 2018.
All research outputs
#1,866,125
of 12,400,381 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#323
of 2,772 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,985
of 339,500 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#10
of 56 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,400,381 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,772 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 339,500 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 56 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.