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Clinical pharmacology of tyrosine kinase inhibitors becoming generic drugs: the regulatory perspective

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, February 2014
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Citations

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Readers on

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59 Mendeley
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Title
Clinical pharmacology of tyrosine kinase inhibitors becoming generic drugs: the regulatory perspective
Published in
Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, February 2014
DOI 10.1186/1756-9966-33-15
Pubmed ID
Authors

Niels Eckstein, Lea Röper, Bodo Haas, Henrike Potthast, Ulrike Hermes, Christoph Unkrig, Frauke Naumann-Winter, Harald Enzmann

Abstract

Over the last decades, billions have been spent and huge efforts have been taken in basic and clinical cancer research [CA Cancer J Clin63:11-30]. About a decade ago, the arms race between drugs and cancer cells reached a new level by introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) into pharmacological anti-cancer therapy. According to their molecular mechanism of action, TKI in contrast to so-called "classic" or "conventional" cytostatics belong to the group of targeted cancer medicines, characterized by accurately fitting with biological structures (i.e. active centers of kinases). Numerous (partly orphan) indications are covered by this new class of substances. Approximately ten years after the first substances of this class of medicines were authorized, patent protection will end within the next years. The following article covers clinical meaning and regulatory status of anti-cancer TKI and gives an outlook to what is expected from the introduction of generic anti-cancer TKI.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 57 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 17%
Student > Master 10 17%
Student > Bachelor 7 12%
Other 6 10%
Student > Postgraduate 5 8%
Other 11 19%
Unknown 10 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 22%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 12 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 8%
Chemistry 4 7%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 12 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 January 2015.
All research outputs
#3,931,238
of 4,693,373 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research
#202
of 283 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,724
of 163,906 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research
#16
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,693,373 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 283 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 163,906 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.