↓ Skip to main content

Osmolarity influences chondrocyte repair after injury in human articular cartilage

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, January 2015
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Osmolarity influences chondrocyte repair after injury in human articular cartilage
Published in
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13018-015-0158-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yuelong Huang, Yujun Zhang, Xiaoquan Ding, Songyang Liu, Tiezheng Sun

Abstract

BackgroundThe purpose was to determine the influence of irrigation solution osmolarity on articular chondrocytes survival and metabolic state following mechanical injury.MethodsOsteochondral explants were harvested from patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis and then cut through their full thickness to establish mechanical injury models. Cartilage explants were incubated in irrigation solutions (saline and balanced salt) with different osmolarities (180, 280, 380, 580 mOsm/L) for 2 h. The percentage of cell death (100¿×¿number of dead cells/number of dead and live cells) was quantified with the laser confocal microscopy. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay was performed to detect apoptosis index of injured cartilage. The contents of proteoglycan elution were determined by spectrophotometer at 530 nm, and HIF-1¿ and type II collagen mRNA yields were quantified with real-time PCR.Results In situ dead chondrocytes were mainly localized to the superficial tangential region of injured cartilage edge after mechanical injury. The percentage of cell death was decreased, and proteoglycan elution was gradually reduced with the increasing of osmolarity. The apoptosis indices of TUNEL assay in different osmolarities had no significant difference (P¿=¿0.158). HIF-1¿ and type II collagen mRNA yields were the least for chondrocytes exposed to 180 mOsm/L medium and were the greatest for chondrocytes exposed to 380 mOsm/L medium. Compared with the saline group, the cell death of superficial zone was significantly decreased (P¿=¿0.001) and contents of proteoglycan elution were also significantly decreased (P¿=¿0.045) in the balanced salt. HIF-1¿ (P¿=¿0.017) and type II collagen (P¿=¿0.034) mRNA yields in the chondrocytes exposed to the balanced salt were significantly more than the saline group.ConclusionThe osmolarity of irrigation solutions plays an important role in the survival and metabolic state of chondrocytes following mechanical injury, and the chondrocyte death is not caused by apoptosis. Increasing osmolarity of irrigation solutions may be chondroprotective with decreasing the chondrocyte death, reducing inhibition of metabolism and proteoglycan elution, ultimately preventing cartilage degeneration and promoting integrative repair.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 5%
Finland 1 2%
Unknown 40 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 30%
Student > Bachelor 5 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 12%
Student > Master 3 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 13 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 26%
Engineering 7 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 15 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 January 2015.
All research outputs
#20,252,875
of 22,782,096 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research
#1,165
of 1,366 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#296,723
of 352,978 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research
#10
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,782,096 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,366 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 352,978 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.