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Detection of asymptomatic carriers of malaria in Kohat district of Pakistan

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, January 2018
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2 tweeters

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Title
Detection of asymptomatic carriers of malaria in Kohat district of Pakistan
Published in
Malaria Journal, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2191-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Muhammad Abdul Naeem, Suhaib Ahmed, Saleem Ahmed Khan

Abstract

Kohat district is one of the medium intensity malaria transmission areas in Pakistan where asymptomatic carriers are likely to form a reservoir of infection. This study was done to explore the possibility of using microscopy, rapid diagnostic testing (RDT), real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RT-PCR followed by endpoint fluorometry (EPF) for detection of malaria in asymptomatic immediate family members of patients of malaria (homestead) and in a sample from the general population of Kohat. This cross-sectional study was done at Combined Military Hospital Kohat and Molecular Lab of Riphah International University, Islamabad from Jan to Dec 2015. A total of 1000 individuals including 200 microscopy positive patients of malaria, 400 asymptomatic immediate family members (homestead) of the active patients of malaria and 400 apparently healthy controls were tested by microscopy, RDT and RT-PCR. At the end of RT-PCR the result were read by EPF. In the 200 malaria microscopy positive patients, 190 (95%) were RDT positive and all were RT-PCR positive. In the 400 individuals from the homestead of malaria patients, 6 (1.5%) individuals were malaria microscopy positive while RDT failed to pick any positive and 32 (8%) were RT-PCR positive for malaria. EPF of all the RT-PCR positive results were positive and the negative results were negative. The difference in the frequency of malaria in the homestead versus general population was very significant (p = 0.0002) and the relative risk of malaria was 4.0 times higher (95% CI 1.87-8.57). The chances of detecting asymptomatic malaria carriers is significantly higher in the homestead of malaria patients than in the general population and for this purpose RT-PCR with EPF can be very useful in the diagnosis of malaria especially with low parasite density.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Researcher 2 6%
Lecturer 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 15 47%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 6%
Chemical Engineering 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 17 53%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 January 2019.
All research outputs
#10,706,919
of 14,088,520 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#3,374
of 4,067 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#237,631
of 357,891 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,088,520 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,067 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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