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An attenuated rate of leg muscle protein depletion and leg free amino acid efflux over time is seen in ICU long-stayers

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, January 2018
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

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77 tweeters

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

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44 Mendeley
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Title
An attenuated rate of leg muscle protein depletion and leg free amino acid efflux over time is seen in ICU long-stayers
Published in
Critical Care, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13054-017-1932-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lena Gamrin-Gripenberg, Martin Sundström-Rehal, Daniel Olsson, Jonathan Grip, Jan Wernerman, Olav Rooyackers

Abstract

There is extensive documentation on skeletal muscle protein depletion during the initial phase of critical illness. However, for intensive care unit (ICU) long-stayers, objective data are very limited. In this study, we examined skeletal muscle protein and amino acid turnover in patients with a prolonged ICU stay. Patients (n = 20) were studied serially every 8-12 days between days 10 and 40 of their ICU stay as long as patients stayed in the ICU. Leg muscle protein turnover was assessed by measurements of phenylalanine kinetics, for which we employed a stable isotope-labeled phenylalanine together with two-pool and three-pool models for calculations, and results were expressed per 100 ml of leg volume. In addition, leg muscle amino acid flux was studied. The negative leg muscle protein net balance seen on days 10-20 of the ICU stay disappeared by days 30-40 (p = 0.012). This was attributable mainly to an increase in the de novo protein synthesis rate (p = 0.007). It was accompanied by an attenuated efflux of free amino acids from the leg. Leg muscle protein breakdown rates stayed unaltered (p = 0.48), as did the efflux of 3-methylhistidine. The arterial plasma concentrations of free amino acids did not change over the course of the study. In critically ill patients with sustained organ failure and in need of a prolonged ICU stay, the initial high rate of skeletal muscle protein depletion was attenuated over time. The distinction between the acute phase and a more prolonged and more stable phase concerning skeletal muscle protein turnover must be considered in study protocols as well as in clinical practice. Australian New Zealand Trial Registry, ACTRN12616001012460 . Retrospectively registered on 1 August 2016.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 77 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 18%
Student > Master 7 16%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Other 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 8 18%
Unknown 9 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 9%
Neuroscience 2 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 11 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 46. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 November 2020.
All research outputs
#646,952
of 19,853,837 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#499
of 5,647 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,975
of 389,315 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#3
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,853,837 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,647 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 389,315 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.